The Beauty of Pow Wow Regalia…And How To Create Your Own!

“These elaborate Native American outfits are very unique to each dancer, but they also speak of familial ties – as dancers move to the rhythmic beat of the drum, they tell of their tribal affiliation and ancestry, reveal their individual personality, family heritage, and spiritual quests.” Tracey, Prairie Edge

Fancy Pow Wow dancer Fabian Fontenelle. Photo- national geographic

Fancy Pow Wow dancer Fabian Fontenelle. Photo- national geographic

Excerpt: History and Tradition Mixed with Personal Style By Tracey, Prairie Edge

“Embodying the spirit and soul of the culture, the dancers at Pow Wow are vibrant reflections of tribal history mixed with personal style.
The regalia worn during Pow Wow is a cherished garment – it is often made or commissioned by those special to the dancer.

Verna Street Fancy Shawl Spotlight Dance - Mountain Eagle Pow Wow. Photo Marty Thompson Rezboyz Photography.

Verna Street Fancy Shawl Spotlight Dance – Mountain Eagle Pow Wow. Photo Marty Thompson Rezboyz Photography.

While beautiful and rewarding once it’s done, making regalia is also a time intensive process and is often made to be with the dancer for many years. These outfits will evolve and change over a lifetime – enhanced with a new scarf, roach or even face paint, further embellished with beads, feathers, shells, or fringe, or (due to the intense dancing and wear) repaired and made new.” 

Making Regalia with Juaquin Lonelodge 

Juaquin Lonelodge

Juaquin Lonelodge

“From the Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho Nation, here in Oklahoma, I Juaquin Lonelodge, am proud to bring you,  Making Regalia It is a show, which I believe, is the first ever in Native American Culture to showcase step-by-step instructional videos in making Native Attire. With the help of CATV47, I plan to continue showcasing Native Art from the Traditional to the Contemporary.   H’aho! (Thank you)” Juaquin Lonelodge

You Tube “Making Regalia” Videos

Moccasin Alterations

Special guest host, Verna Street demonstrates how to make alterations on a moccasin for a growing child. Published on Jan 29, 2016

Moccasin Alteration with guest Verna Street

Moccasin Alteration with guest Verna Street Fancy Shawl Dancer.

Decorative Carry Bag

Juaquin gives step by step instructions on how to make a simple, decorative carry bag. Episode includes some basic sewing tips.

Decorative Bag.

Decorative Bag.

Fancy Dance Regalia, drawing by Kathryn Darnell (from pg. 55, Marsha MacDowell, ed. Contemporary Great Lakes Pow Wow Regalia

Fancy Dance Regalia, drawing by Kathryn Darnell (from pg. 55, Marsha MacDowell, ed. Contemporary Great Lakes Pow Wow Regalia

 

Making Regalia Roach Spinners

Juaquin Lonelodge is back with a brand new edition of Making Regalia. On this latest episode they have recurring guest Red Sky Whapeppah in the studio to help construct a roach spinner.

Making Roach Spinners See diagram

Making Roach Spinners See diagram

Bustle construction

Juaquin Lonelodge and his special guest, Dwight Whitebuffalo discuss and demonstrate bustle construction.

Guest Dwight Whitebuffalo demonstrates bustle construction.

Guest Dwight Whitebuffalo demonstrates bustle construction.

“To many people their outfits are a part of them. Some people dreamed of their outfits and they hold special meaning. A lot of people I know, their outfits have been handed down to them from their grandfather or grandmother. These aren’t just something we throw together.”  ~Bedahbin Webkamigad~

Category: Pow Wows

Meet 12-Year-old Navajo Lead Actor in Nemo Há’dèístíí/ Finding Nemo

“Twelve-year-old Quinton Kien is not exactly your typical Hollywood actor but he blew this one out of the water. As the voice of the title character in the Navajo version of Disney Pixar’s Finding Nemo, Kien made quite an impression on his grandmother Julia Hildreth.” Donovan Quintero, Navajo Times

Quinton Kien is helping Disney-Pixar create a Navajo language version

Quinton Kien is helping Disney-Pixar create a Navajo language version

Excerpt:   12-year-old shines in new Navajo-dubbed Pixar film, Donovan Quintero, Navajo Times

“Nizhoní, said Hildreth, of Steamboat, Ariz., at the premiere on Monday night in Albuquerque at the Century Rio 24 theaters. Kien played the voice of “Nemo” in this latest installment where the Navajo Nation Museum collaborated with Hollywood executives to dub the movie in Navajo. The first film to be dubbed in Navajo, Star Wars, was done in 2013.

Actor Quinton Kien.

Actor Quinton Kien.

This project was different from Star Wars, said Navajo Nation Museum Director Manuel Wheeler. There was a lot of dialogue and emotion aimed towards children and that was what we were looking for. With the way it was received on Monday, Wheeler said the first screening went beautifully. The audience seemed to react to it.”

Nemo Há’dèístíí/ Finding Nemo is now on DVD

If you think this trailer is awesome, wait till you see the whole movie!! The Nemo Há’déést’įį’ DVD’s are coming!! Pre-order at navajonemo.com or come to the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock, AZ on TUESDAY APRIL 26 at 8AM to purchase your copy!!  For more info call  NNM at 928.871.7941.

Navajo Museum

 “ Nemo Há’déést’íí” : With some elders in the audience, I think the benefits of making this movie is they can watch this with their grandchildren,.” ~Manuel Wheeler.~Navajo Nation Museum Director 

Category: Native Actors

Natives Ask President Obama To Pardon Leonard Peltier

“Leonard Peltier, an Anishinabe-Lakota Native American serving two consecutive life sentences and imprisoned for over 40 years, remains a lightening rod in the Native American fight for human rights. When arrested he was a leading member of the American Indian Movement (AIM), an advocacy group and movement concerned with Native American rights and justice.” M. Muhammad, Finalcall.com

Leonard Peltier

Leonard Peltier

Excerpt: A Call for President Obama To Pardon Native American freedom Fighter,  By Michael Muhammad, Finalcall.com

“According to the organization’s website, AIM is first a spiritual movement, a religious rebirth, and then the rebirth of pride and dignity of a people. The organization emphasizes self-determination.

In 1975, during a confrontation involving AIM members, two FBI agents were shot dead. Mr. Peltier was convicted of their murders, but has always said he is innocent. To some he is a hero and to others he is painted as a thug.

Amnesty International has studied his case extensively over many years and remains seriously concerned about the fairness of proceedings leading to his trial and conviction. Amnesty believes political factors may have influenced the way in which the case was prosecuted.

Photo- oregonlive

Photo- oregonlive

In fact, the Commission has repeatedly denied parole on the grounds that Mr. Peltier did not accept criminal responsibility for the murders of the two FBI agents…Given the current climate of police misconduct, a failed criminal justice system pockmarked with injustices against Black and Native American people it is hoped President Obama will take a serious look at the clemency request, supporters say.”

“Innocence has a single voice that can only say over and over again, “I didn’t do it.” Guilt has a thousand voices, all of them lies.”  ~Leonard Peltier~ Prison Writings

Category: Law

Native Actor Adam Beach Joins the SUICIDE SQUAD

“The third and latest Warner Bros. trailer of the highly anticipated DC universe movie Suicide Squad just hit YouTube, garnering nearly 5 million hits in less than 48 hours. Included in the entourage of super-villains gone heroic is Adam Beach’s character Slipknot, who plays a key role in the trailer.” V. Schilling, ICTMN

Native Actor Adam Beach as Slipknot

Native Actor Adam Beach as Slipknot

 

Excerpt: Adam Beach as Slipknot “Nails It” in Third Suicide Squad Trailer

“The assorted cast of ‘Worst Heroes Ever’ characters in the third trailer also include Jared Leto as the Joker, Will Smith as Deadshot, Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn.

Actor Jared Leto- The Joker

Actor Jared Leto- The Joker

Other members of the Suicide Squad include Joel Kinnaman (Rick Flag), Viola Davis (Amanda Waller), Jai Courtney (Boomerang), Jay Hernandez (El Diablo), Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (Killer Croc – and yes, he is a crocodile), Cara Delevingne (Julie Moon / Enchantress) and Karen Fukuhara (Tatsu Yamashiro / Katana).

You Tube:  SUICIDE SQUAD Official Trailer #3 (2016) Superhero Movie HD

SUICIDE SQUAD: A secret government agency recruits imprisoned super-villains to execute dangerous black ops missions in exchange for clemency.

Poster 2

 

Director: David Ayer

Writers: David Ayer, John Ostrander (comic book)

Suicide Squad will be in theaters – IMAX and 3D – August 5th.

“It’s taken me some time, but I finally have them. The worst of the worst. I want to assemble a task force of the most dangerous people on the planet, who I think can do some good.” ~Actress Viola Davis~ (as  Commander Amanda Waller in Suicide Squad)

Category: Uncategorized

For Many Natives “Pot” is Prayer Smoke

“A federal court has ruled that a church for Native Americans in Hawaii should not be excused from federal marijuana laws despite the group’s claim that ingesting cannabis is part of their sacred sacrament… Michael Rex ‘Raging Bear’ Mooney, who founded the church states, it’s really disappointing, Cannabis is a prayer smoke, so it’s a sacrament … through the effects of the medicine, it also helps us become closer to our creator. It puts us in a place, a state of mind, where we can actually feel the presence and an actual relationship with our creator.” C. Bussewitz, ABCNews

Healing with Green

Healing with Green

Excerpt: Native American Church Not Excused From Cannabis Laws, by C. Bussewitz, ABCNews

“The Native American Church of Hawaii [formerly known as Oklevueha Native American Church] had asked for relief from federal marijuana laws under the U.S. Religious Freedom Restoration Act, saying they used cannabis during sweat lodge ceremonies to help people connect with their creator.

Members of the Oklevueha Native American Church, Seminole Medicine Man James Mooney and Ogala Medicine Chief Richard.

Members of the Oklevueha Native American Church, Seminole Medicine Man James Mooney and Ogala Medicine Chief Richard.

A district court ruled against the claim, saying the church didn’t produce enough admissible evidence about its religion other than a strong belief in the benefits of marijuana. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Wednesday upheld the district court’s decision, saying a prohibition of cannabis doesn’t impose a substantial burden on their right to exercise their religion…But the church in its practice can also use peyote, a hallucinogenic drug used in Native American rituals. Federal law allows tribal Indians and members of the Native American Church to use peyote in religious ceremonies.

Sacred plants

Sacred plants

The court in its ruling said the church made no claim that peyote is unavailable or that cannabis serves a unique religious function, so prohibiting cannabis doesn’t force Mooney or the church to choose between obedience to their religion or criminal sanction.”

“Man’s relationship with the divine can’t be dictated by any other person or government entity,”   ~Michael Glenn~ Tribal Lawyer
“The illegality of cannabis is outrageous, an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight, sensitivity and fellowship so desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world.” ~Carl Sagan~Academic, Astronomer, Scientist, Author.

Category: Culture

Native People and Diabetes: A Serious Struggle

SPECIAL: “Joseph Medicine Crow, the last living war chief of the Crow Tribe of Montana and a renowned Native American historian and anthropologist, died on Sunday at a hospice in Billings, Mont. He was 102.” Mike McPhate, April 4, 2016- The New York Times 

MAY HE REST IN PEACE2

TEACHERS: Crow Nation Lesson Plan with Answer Key here

 

Joseph Medicine Crow spoke at a dedication for a Peace Memorial near the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana. Beck Bohrer NYT

Joseph Medicine Crow spoke at a dedication for a Peace Memorial near the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana. Beck Bohrer NYT

 

Native People and Diabetes: A Serious Struggle

“It seems like every time I talk to my mom she gives me a rundown about which family members are sick and/or injured. Usually it’s something not-too-serious…Well this most recent list of our family’s walking wounded, she told me about an uncle who has been sick with diabetes…this time in the hospital [he had] to get his leg amputated—it kinda left me stunned and thinking about all the many times I’ve seen other Native people losing battles to diabetes. From my own family I’ve seen body parts get chopped off, children traumatized, and then we see them back at the casino buffet line or drinking Red Bull or Pepsi until the next incident happens.” G. Ross, ICTMN

Courtesy Wesley Roach, Skan Media. ICTMN

Courtesy Wesley Roach, Skan Media. ICTMN

Excerpt: Diabetes…Rethinking Our Relationship with Sugar By Gyasi Ross, ICTMN

“I’m not one to talk about bad dietary habits as any sort of authority. Honestly. I have friends who are doing amazing things in wellness and nutrition and teaching Native people how get back to ancestral ways of co-existing with health and wellness and nutrition…but honestly that’s not me. I’m honestly not focusing how to Indigenize my diet; instead I’m forcing myself not to eat Dark Chocolate Kit Kats every night or eat corn chips pretty much every single day.

Healthier Native diets. photo-voanews

Healthier Native diets. photo-voanews

Depending upon where I’m at, I am more or less likely to consume disgusting amounts of sugar—usually at night. I don’t know why that is (if anybody does, please explain it to me). But when I’m on the road, I’ll usually stop in someplace and get some trail-mix or Cracker Jacks; not the worst thing in the world, but still bad to be eating at 1:30 in the morning …(plus, tells you that I have a lame social life.) I’m addicted to sugar. It seems like a whole bunch of us are.

NACA Photo-ICTMN

NACA Photo-ICTMN

I was fortunate to visit the Native American Community Academy (“NACA”) in Albuquerque and was immediately struck by all of the nutrition-themed posters around the school.  NACA is a charter school for 6-12th graders and represents more than 30 tribal groups. 

Healthy snacks

Healthy snacks

Fun and healthy snack ideas for children. Photo- huffingtonpost

Fun and healthy snack ideas for children. Photo- huffingtonpost

The school’s Lunch Program and Healthy Snack Program provides that each school day, a private vendor brings freshly prepared lunches for all students at NACA.

Buffalo meat is healthy

Buffalo meat is healthy

Try cartoon themes to get kids to eat healthy. Photo- dailymail.co

Try cartoon themes to get kids to eat healthy. Photo- dailymail.co

The school says that it is striving to improve the quality of lunches by providing culturally sensitive meals such as buffalo instead of beef, more vegetable choices, and locally grown produce. Healthy, free snacks are also offered to students in the morning and after school.

Delicious Algonquin Three sisters Veggies- corn, beans, and squash.

Delicious Algonquin Three sisters Veggies- corn, beans, and squash.

Healthy Native food. Photo- tahtonka.com

Healthy Native food. Photo- tahtonka.com

I know diabetes, like any disease, is not just about willpower… I will splurge from time to time—we all deserve it sometimes—but I have to remind myself that it is a disease and I am an addict and what’s a safe amount of heroin to give a heroin addict?”

Gyasi Ross author, lawyer and singer.

Gyasi Ross author, lawyer and singer.

“You don’t deal with sickness with shame or judgment or silence; you deal with it by bringing it out into the light of day and educating those most at risk for the sickness.” ~Gyasi Ross~ 

Category: Health