The Beauty of the Nottoway Tribe of VA Pow Wow

“2016 marked the ninth annual pow wow for the Nottoway Indian Tribe of Virginia in Surry County Virginia. The tribe first received state recognition in the Commonwealth of Virginia on February 26, 2010. Over the weekend, dancers and vendors and appreciative onlookers came to Surry County in beautiful weather to enjoy the celebration and dance.” V. Schilling, ICTMN

chief-lynette-allston-center-seated-is-proud-of-the-male-warriors-in-her-tribe-photo-vincent-schilling

chief-lynette-allston-center-seated-is-proud-of-the-male-warriors-in-her-tribe-photo-vincent-schilling

Excerpt: Great Images of the Nottoway Indian Tribe of VA Pow Wow By Vincent Schilling, ICTMN

“In addition to the festivities, the Nottoway Indian Tribe of Virginia Pow Wow also performed a drum song and honor dance in solidarity with the water protectors in North Dakota.

a-young-male-warrior-looks-into-the-camera-without-fear-photo-vincent-schilling-tiff

a-young-male-warrior-looks-into-the-camera-without-fear-photo-vincent-schilling

head-dancer-louis-campbell-lumbee-always-wows-the-crowds-photo-vincent-schilling

head-dancer-louis-campbell-lumbee-always-wows-the-crowds-photo-vincent-schilling

this-energetic-young-male-dancer-was-a-crowd-favorite-photo-vincent-schilling

this-energetic-young-male-dancer-was-a-crowd-favorite-photo-vincent-schilling

a-dance-in-honor-of-nodapl-solidarity-photo-vincent-schilling-tiff

a-dance-in-honor-of-nodapl-solidarity-photo-vincent-schilling-tiff

a-young-ribbon-shawl-dancer-at-the-pow-wow-photo-vincent-schilling

a-young-ribbon-shawl-dancer-at-the-pow-wow-photo-vincent-schilling

According to Chief Allston, we have pipelines coming through our area that are just as disruptive. So we need to be careful and take care of our earth – that is our charge as Native people – to protect the environment.”

“We as Native nations need to come together because it is not just the water of our Lakota brothers and sisters, it is the water around the world.” ~ Chief  Lynette Allston~ Nottoway Indian Tribe of Virginia

Category: Pow Wows

Natives Need More Training and Control over Digital Tech

“Companies supplying indigenous people with services should have a cultural protocol to clarify who are the custodians of their data.Digital tech can damage indigenous culture by revealing sacred sites or rituals…indigenous people need better rights to access and destroy sensitive data.” M. Jade, Scidev

from-3d-printing-to-programming-robots-young-indigenous-people-will-take-part-in-a-unique-digital-training-in-australia-ncie-org

from-3d-printing-to-programming-robots-young-indigenous-people-will-take-part-in-a-unique-digital-training-in-australia-ncie-org

Excerpt: Indigenous people need control over digital tech By Mikaela Jade

Indigenous people need more support to become tech-savvy and deal with the threats digital technology can pose to their culture, a conference has heard.

Digital technologies such as smartphones and drones can bring problems as well as advantages to indigenous communities an expert panel said at the World Conservation Congress. Without in-depth knowledge of the scope of such technology, indigenous people may allow themselves to be misrepresented and their knowledge to get exploited, they said.

One issue is the struggle to keep sacred sites a secret in a world where posting photos and publishing blogs can reveal their locations…The panel, which took place on [the] 5, of  September in Honolulu, Hawaii, acknowledged that digital technology can enable indigenous communities to claim rights over land and better preserve traditions. Having access to GPS mapping, social media platforms and other communication tools is also crucial, to make their voices more prominent in global discussions, the panelists agreed.”

“The best way forward is for communities and digital companies to work together.”-Roberto Borreo, a consultant at the International Indian Treaty Council

Category: Technology

New Look for Fall: Native Wearable Art

Two up-and-coming Southwest designers are releasing highly anticipated new looks this fall.Though Loren Aragon (Acoma Pueblo) and Jared Yazzie (Diné) create fashions on opposite ends of the spectrum—beautifully-designed couture and issue-oriented streetwear, respectively—both designers look to tell the stories of their people through wearable art.” T. Walker, Native Peoples Magazine

loren-aragon-inmaricopa

loren-aragon-inmaricopa

Excerpt:  New Fall Looks from Indigenous Designers, By Tate Walker, Native Peoples Magazine

“Aragon and Yazzie were led to fashion in roundabout ways, and while they both create awe-inspiring clothing concepts, the importance of their work goes beyond style. Indeed, as the popularity of their work grows, the two have stepped into the sometimes stressful but important role of ensuring Native peoples are respected and represented accurately in an industry that often reduces Indigenous cultures to monolithic, tribal-inspired trends.

ACONAV

aconav-creator-loren-aragon-at-his-home-office-photo-by-tate-walker

aconav creator loren aragon at his home office. photo by tate walker

The bold, geometric strokes swirling across ACONAV gowns and dresses make them look like they belong in an art gallery next to priceless Acoma pottery.

Though it may seem Aragon has been creating women’s fashions for decades, the 36-year-old picked up his first needle just four years ago; he had worked as a mechanical engineer doing things like automotive testing and military applications for 13 years.

loren-aragon-designs

loren-aragon-designs

It was more of a wanting to reconnect with family, because I’ve seen my mother and aunts being seamstresses for most of their lives, so I thought I’d go back and learn some of that, says Aragon, who has always had a talent for making Acoma-style crafts, including museum-quality gourd work, jewelry and pottery.

Loren Aragon (Acoma Pueblo) will show his pottery-inspired couture fashions on runways during PLITZS New York City Fashion Week on Sept. 10 and at Phoenix Fashion Week Oct. 13-15.

OXDX (It’s pronounced: Oh-Ex-Dee-Ex. Not Ox Docks).

oxdx creator jared yazzie at his home office. photo by tate walker

oxdx creator jared yazzie at his home office. photo by tate walker

“OXDX stands for OverDose and pays homage to one of Jared Yazzie’s favorite punk rock bands, MxPx, which stands for Magnified Plaid. OXDX describes how we view the world and how we need to pull back and remember our culture and traditions, Yazzie says of his 7-year-old company, which officially launched as he gave away T-shirts to friends at his own birthday party.

Like the punk music he listens to as he works, what Yazzie does to create his T-shirts is nothing short of masterfully rebellious art. His design skill includes all the things you’d expect of a top-notch graphic artist, in addition to expert understanding of pop culture and its impact on Native identity and tribal issues.

design-by-oxdx

design-by-oxdx

People are experts at telling their own stories, and these days everyone’s story is so different, says Yazzie, adding that Natives need to be able to tell their own stories, whether through films, books or fashion, without outsiders trying to appropriate, steal or otherwise misrepresent hundreds of unique tribal cultures”

oxdx-at-www-powwows-com

oxdx-at-www-powwows-com

Jared Yazzie (Diné), known for creating streetwear that Indigenizes punk culture and doesn’t shy away from tough Native issues, will launch his 2016 fall lineup Sept. 17.

“I have bigger challenges for myself; I definitely want to do more with haute couture and have plans to show those designs in the future.”~ Loren Aragon~

“We’re in an age of collaboration…And that’s been awesome.” ~Jared Yazzie~

candletiff

Category: Fashion

The ND Sioux and the Pipeline Battle: Key Information

“This week, an impassioned fight over a 1,170-mile oil pipeline moved from the prairies of North Dakota to a federal courtroom in Washington. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe, whose reservation lies just south of the pipeline’s charted path across ranches and under the Missouri River, has asked a judge to halt construction. The American Indian tribe argues that a leak or spill could be ruinous.” J. Healy, The New York Times

Photo- ejcw.org

Photo- ejcw.org

Excerpt:  North Dakota Oil Pipeline Battle: Who’s Fighting and Why-By Jack Healy, The New York Times

“It may take until Sept. 9, 2016 for a federal judge to decide whether to allow the Dakota Access pipeline to move ahead, or grant an injunction that would press the pause button on construction…Starting with members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, the protest has since grown to several hundred people — estimates vary — most of them from tribes across the country.

The protesters have encamped in a field belonging to the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Each day, they march a mile up a highway to a construction site where preparatory work is being done for the pipeline. While the protesters say they are peaceful, there have been reports of heated confrontations with law enforcement officers and construction workers, and 20 people have been arrested.The pipeline company, Energy Transfer Partners, has sued several protesters, claiming they have threatened and intimidated contractors and were blocking work at the site.

The Arguments:

Energy Transfer Partners Company

The Dakota Access pipeline is a $3.7 billion project that would carry 470,000 barrels of oil a day from the oil fields of western North Dakota to Illinois, where it would be linked with other pipelines. Energy Transfer says the pipeline will pump millions of dollars into local economies and create 8,000 to 12,000 construction jobs — though far fewer permanent jobs to maintain and monitor the pipeline.

Energy Transfer map for pipeline

Energy Transfer map for pipeline

Photo: The Dakota Access pipeline is proposed to transport light, sweet crude oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota and Iowa into Illinois. Traveling through 50 counties in 4 states, the proposed route was carefully designed to transport crude in the safest, most efficient way possible. – Energy Transfer-

Members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe

The tribe see the pipeline as a major environmental and cultural threat. They say its route traverses ancestral lands — which are not part of the reservation — where their forebears hunted, fished and were buried. They say historical and cultural reviews of the land where the pipeline will be buried were inadequate. They also worry about catastrophic environmental damage if the pipeline were to break near where it crosses under the Missouri River.

Vincent Night Horse Fox, 25 White Shield, North Dakota

Vincent Night Horse Fox, 25 White Shield, North Dakota

 

Others Involved in the pipeline battle

State and federal agencies have approved the pipeline, and some farmers and ranchers have welcomed the thousands of dollars in payments that came with signing agreements to allow it to across their land. But others oppose the pipeline.

In Iowa, one of the four states that the pipeline would traverse, some farmers have gone to court to keep it off their land.

How many pipelines in the United States?

The United States has a web of 2.5 million miles of pipelines that carry products like oil and natural gas, pumping them to processing and treatment plants, power plants, homes and businesses. Most of the lines are buried, but some run above ground.

How safe are pipelines?

Energy companies and their federal overseer, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, promote the safety record of pipelines. Pipeline companies say it is far safer to move oil and natural gas in an underground pipe than in rail cars or trucks, which can crash and create huge fires.

But pipeline spills and ruptures occur regularly, sometimes in small leaks and sometimes in catastrophic gushers. In 2013, a Tesoro Logistics pipeline in North Dakota broke open and spilled 865,000 gallons of oil onto a farm. In 2010, an Enbridge Energy pipeline dumped more than 843,000 gallons of oil into the Kalamazoo River in Michigan, resulting in a cleanup that lasted years and cost more than a billion dollars, according to Inside Climate News.

Click HERE for SIOUX Lesson Plans with answer Key

“Army Corps of Engineers is in direct violation of this law. ACOE did not conduct public hearings. They did not include any Tribes that may have cultural ties to the area to join the consultation.” ~ John Eagle Sr,~ a Standing Rock Sioux tribal historic preservation officer.

Category: Culture

Tribes Gather to Block a Pipeline

“Horseback riders, their faces streaked in yellow and black paint, led the procession out of their tepee-dotted camp. Two hundred people followed, making their daily walk a mile up a rural highway to a patch of prairie grass and excavated dirt that has become a new kind of battlefield, between a pipeline and American Indians who say it will threaten water supplies and sacred lands.”  J. Healy, The New York Times

Tribes move to block pipeline. Photo-trendolizer

Tribes move to block pipeline. Photo-trendolizer

Excerpt: Occupying the Prairie: Tensions Rise as Tribes Move to Block a Pipeline — By Jack Healy, The New York Times

“The Texas-based company building the Dakota Access pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners, calls the project a major step toward the United States’ weaning itself off foreign oil. The company says the nearly 1,170-mile buried pipeline will infuse millions of dollars into local economies and is safer than trucks and train cars that can topple and spill and crash and burn.

“The Texas-based company building the Dakota Access pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners, calls the project a major step toward the United States’ weaning itself off foreign oil. The company says the nearly 1,170-mile buried pipeline will infuse millions of dollars into local economies and is safer than trucks and train cars that can topple and spill and crash and burn. But the people who stood at the gates of a construction site where crews had been building an access road toward the pipeline viewed the project as a wounding intrusion onto lands where generations of their ancestors hunted bison, gathered water and were born and buried, long before treaties and fences stamped a different order onto the Plains. People have been gathering since April, but as hundreds more poured in over the past two weeks, confrontations began rising among protesters, sheriff’s officers and construction workers with the pipeline company. Local officials are struggling to handle hundreds of demonstrators filling the roads to protest and camp out in once-empty grassland about an hour south of Bismarck, the state capital. More than 20 people have been arrested on charges including disorderly conduct and trespassing onto the construction site. The pipeline company says it was forced to shut down construction this month after protesters threatened its workers and threw bottles and rocks at contractors’ vehicles. Leaders from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, whose reservation lies just south of the pipeline’s path, say the protests are peaceful. Weapons, drugs and alcohol are prohibited from the protest camp. Children march in the daily demonstrations. The leaders believed the reports of pipe bombs were a misinterpretation of their calls for demonstrators to get out their wooden chanupa pipes — which have deep spiritual importance — and pass them through the crowd. The conflict may reach a crucial moment on Wednesday in a federal court hearing. The tribe has sued to block the pipeline and plans to ask a judge in Washington to effectively halt construction. The pipeline’s route starts in the Bakken oil fields of western North Dakota and ends in Illinois. There have been no moves so far to disband the camp or keep people from demonstrating. But Sheriff Kirchmeier told reporters that the demonstration had become an unlawful protest, and Gov. Jack Dalrymple, citing public safety risks, declared a state of emergency on Friday.”

But the people who stood at the gates of a construction site where crews had been building an access road toward the pipeline viewed the project as a wounding intrusion onto lands where generations of their ancestors hunted bison, gathered water and were born and buried, long before treaties and fences stamped a different order onto the Plains.

People have been gathering since April, but as hundreds more poured in over the past two weeks, confrontations began rising among protesters, sheriff’s officers and construction workers with the pipeline company. Local officials are struggling to handle hundreds of demonstrators filling the roads to protest and camp out in once-empty grassland about an hour south of Bismarck, the state capital.

More than 20 people have been arrested on charges including disorderly conduct and trespassing onto the construction site. The pipeline company says it was forced to shut down construction this month after protesters threatened its workers and threw bottles and rocks at contractors’ vehicles.

CJ Clifford, a member of the Oglala Lakota. Photo- globalnews

CJ Clifford, a member of the Oglala Lakota. Photo- globalnews

Leaders from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, whose reservation lies just south of the pipeline’s path, say the protests are peaceful. Weapons, drugs and alcohol are prohibited from the protest camp. Children march in the daily demonstrations. The leaders believed the reports of pipe bombs were a misinterpretation of their calls for demonstrators to get out their wooden chanupa pipes — which have deep spiritual importance — and pass them through the crowd.

The conflict may reach a crucial moment on Wednesday in a federal court hearing. The tribe has sued to block the pipeline and plans to ask a judge in Washington to effectively halt construction. The pipeline’s route starts in the Bakken oil fields of western North Dakota and ends in Illinois.

There have been no moves so far to disband the camp or keep people from demonstrating. But Sheriff Kirchmeier told reporters that the demonstration had become an unlawful protest, and Gov. Jack Dalrymple, citing public safety risks, declared a state of emergency on Friday.”

“They need to stay out… They don’t know where the burials are. They don’t know where the sacred sites are. I’m trying my best to keep the peace.” ~ Jon Eagle Sr.~ historic preservation officer for the Standing Rock Sioux

Category: Business | Tags:

NetFlix: Bucking Bulls and Broken Bones

“Superlatives fall like thudding hooves in the Netflix documentary series Fearless available on Friday. Bull riding is definitely the most dangerous sport in the world. It’s the fastest-growing sport in America. Professional Bull Riders, whose 2015 season the series chronicles, is a global phenomenon.” M. Hale, The New York Times

Photo- dailymail

Photo- dailymail

Excerpt: Netflix’s ‘Fearless’ Explores the World’s ‘Most Dangerous Sport -By Mike Hale

“Between the entertainment-sports conglomerate WME-IMG and Netflix, the deep-pocketed streaming service, there was probably a lot of money available to produce four hours of television (across six episodes) about bull riding.

Fearless, directed by Michael John Warren, looks good and moves smoothly. The graphic design and music are several levels above those of the cable reality series in this genre.

Native Dakota Louis rides Maverick.-pbr

Native Dakota Louis rides Maverick.-pbr

There isn’t quite enough content to fill those four hours, though. The wary but amicable relationship between American and Brazilian riders provides some diversion.

Yet the competitions, including the season championship, aren’t terribly dramatic, except for the somber moments when paramedics have to be called into the ring.

But Fearless has one great ace up its sleeve. Nothing looks quite like the slow-motion footage of those eight-second (or shorter) rides.

Kaique Pacheco in “Fearless,” a new documentary series on Netflix that explores bull riding. Credit Alberto Gonzaga:Netflix

Kaique Pacheco in “Fearless,” a new documentary series on Netflix that explores bull riding. Credit Alberto Gonzaga:Netflix

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The riders become rag dolls, their bodies jerking and folding in seemingly impossible ways. Often there’s the grisly bonus of seeing them fly off the bulls’ backs and desperately try to avoid their jackhammering hooves.”

Photo-likalaugh.org

Photo-likalaugh.org

Category: Social