Domestic Violence: “Walking With Our Sisters”

October 20th, 2013  |  Published in Education

O’siyo. October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Domestic violence is a global concern and we as a people should help as much as we can. The following are some courageous Native women who are activists against domestic violence.

photo- Radical Profeminist

photo- Radical Profeminist

Tinnekkia Williams is a Native American and domestic violence activist who works with women at Standing Rock Reservation in North and South Dakota. (Photo- Getty Images).

Tinnekkia Williams is a Native American and domestic violence activist who works with women at Standing Rock Reservation in North and South Dakota. (Photo- Getty Images).

“According to the Times’ Williams, the situation for Native American women is now so bleak that some advocates are reluctantly starting to question whether they should advise victims to press charges—the anguish of seeing justice unserved is too much to bear. “ Read more…

Navajo Singer Radmilla Cody is a domestic violence activist who works with women and many organizations. Photo- Performing the Dawn Song youtube.

Navajo Singer Radmilla Cody is a domestic violence activist who works with women and created the “Strong Spirit: Life Is Beautiful Not Abusive” campaign. Photo- Performing the Dawn Song youtube.

“Radmilla Cody is an award-winning Native American recording artist, international performer, former Miss Navajo Nation, and founder of the “Strong Spirit: Life Is Beautiful Not Abusive” campaign, which brings awareness to teen dating violence.  As a survivor of domestic violence, Radmilla uses her personal experiences to advocate throughout Native America and internationally for the importance of understanding and identifying unhealthy relationships and recognizing healthy relationships. In her lectures, Radmilla incorporates the message of self-respect, self-worth, cultural pride, and identity.  She combines educational tools and personal experience to help attendees gain an insightful and empowering message about resiliency and creating positive change.” Read more…

Tillie Black Bear is the executive director and one of the founders  of the White Buffalo Calf Woman Society, Inc. (WBCWS) that serves the Lakota Sioux Rosebud Reservation in Mission, S.D. Photo: mostly water.

Tillie Black Bear is the executive director and one of the founders of the White Buffalo Calf Woman Society, Inc. (WBCWS) that serves the Lakota Sioux Rosebud Reservation in Mission, S.D. Photo: mostly water.

“Tillie Black Bear is an enrolled member of the Sicangu Lakota Nation/Rosebud Sioux Tribe. She is presently the Executive Director of the White Buffalo Calf Woman Society, Inc., which operates the oldest shelter for women who have been battered or raped on Indian reservations; and is the first shelter for women of color in the U.S. (1978). She was the first woman of color to chair NCADV and continues to sit on the Board of Director for the SDCADV&SA.
Black Bear presently serves on the advisory board of National Sexual Assault Resource Center, Pennsylvania and is past member of the professional advisory board of the National Domestic Violence Hotline, Austin, TX.” Read more…

Walking With Our Sisters Exhibit. Photo-rememberingour sisterseverywhere.

Walking With Our Sisters Exhibit. Photo-rememberingour sisterseverywhere.

“Walking With Our Sisters” is a commemorative art installation for the missing and murdered indigenous women of Canada and the United States. Representing the unfinished lives of over 600 missing or murdered Indigenous women in Canada, the Walking With Our Sisters project contains only part of a moccasin, the vamp. The vamp, the top part of a moccasin, is most visible and is often beautifully decorated.” Read more..

NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH, 2013 Photo- dcmilitary.

The Blanket Around Her

“maybe it is her birth which she holds close to herself

or her death which is just as inseparable…hanging in turquoise from her neck

oh woman remember who you are woman…it is the whole earth.”

~Joy Harjo~Creek Nation

Kudos to all people that stand up to domestic violence and abuse of women.