Category Archives: Social

Replica of Native Execution Device Is Not Art!

“The Walker Art Center has postponed the opening of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden until 10 June following protests from Native American groups surrounding a work by the artist Sam Durant that references US state-sanctioned hangings. Among the historic gallows recreated in Durant’s wooden sculpture Scaffold (2012) is one used in 1862 to hang 38 Dakota men executed by the US Army in Mankato, Minnesota.” H. Stoilas, The Art Newspaper

Durant’s recreation of hanging scaffold used on Natives in 1862.

Excerpt: Walker Art Center postpones opening of sculpture park after Native American protests

“The work will probably be dismantled after a meeting between the artist, the museum and Dakota elders on Wednesday. Announced in January 2016 as one of the 16 new works acquired for the park’s reopening this June, Scaffold was originally commissioned and shown at Documenta in Kassel in 2012.

Photo- MPR news

[according to a  press release statement] ‘With the death penalty as its focus, Scaffold opens a discussion around criminal law and the politics of incarceration—themes which continue to resonate today.’

On Thursday 25 May, the Walker’s director Olga Viso wrote about the new acquisitions, including Scaffold on a blog post on the museum’s website. This prompted an outcry from Minnesota’s Native American community, over its use of a traumatic symbol of brutality against the Dakota people, the museum’s failure to consult tribal leaders in its acquisition and installation, and the fact that the work was made by a white artist.

Protest signs against scaffold. photo- The Art Newspaper

Signs posted on the fence surrounding the park said ‘Not your story’ and ‘$200 for scalp of artist’.  Both Durant and Viso released statements apologizing for the hurt caused to the community and offering the dismantle the piece.

MinnPost

‘It has been my belief that white artists need to address issues of white supremacy and its institutional manifestations. Whites created the concept of race and have used it to maintain dominance for centuries, whites must be involved in its dismantling,’ Durant said. ‘However, your protests have shown me that I made a grave miscalculation in how my work can be received by those in a particular community.’ Viso said: ‘As director of the Walker, I regret that I did not better anticipate how the work would be received in Minnesota, especially by Native audiences.”

Category: Social

Native Super Moms!

“Among the many tribes of Native Americans throughout North America there were many different roles for the Native American women. The roles of many Native American women were very important to every Indian tribe.” Native Net

‘Super Native Woman’ design by Jared Yazzie and OXDX Clothing

Excerpt: Native American Women, Native Net

“Women are important to any society since they are the bearers of children, but to Native American tribes the women had many other very important responsibilities.

Native women cooking on open fire

Among some American Indian tribes the women would make many of the weapons that were used for hunting and war, and also built the homes they lived in, gathered firewood, as well as herbs for medicine, and nuts and berries for food.

Native arts

Native American women are the ones that made the crafts that have become very popular forms of art worldwide. Some of the crafts they are known most for are the hand woven and quilted blankets, colorful beaded necklaces, handmade and painted pottery.

Native American Women Warriors

No matter what tribe you are referring to, the women were always very important and had many different roles for the survival of the tribe.”

 

Yakama Native American Mother and Child


Category: Social

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

“An NIJ-funded study shows that American Indian and Alaska Native women and men suffer violence at alarmingly high rates.More than four in five American Indian and Alaska Native women and men have experienced violence in their lifetime, and more than one in three experienced violence in the past year, according to a new report from an NIJ-funded study.” NIJ-

dioceseofnewark-org

dioceseofnewark-org

Excerpt: Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men

“The study, part of NIJ’s research program on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women, looked at how prevalent psychological aggression and physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and sexual violence were among American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. It also examined the perpetrators’ race and the impact of the violence.

sam-english-nij

sam-english-nij

The results, which show high rates of violence against both women and men, provide the most thorough assessment on the extent of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men to date. These results complement those from the National Crime Victimization Survey.

lcsj-org

lcsj-org

American Indian and Alaska Native men also have high victimization rates. More than four in five American Indian and Alaska Native men (81.6 percent) have experienced violence in their lifetime.

opendemocracy-net

opendemocracy-net

These results should raise awareness and understanding of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native victims. They also highlight the continued need for services for American Indian and Alaska Native victims of crime.”

“The physical and emotional scars of domestic violence can cast a long shadow. Too many individuals, regardless of age, ability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, circumstance, or race, face the pain and fear of domestic violence. During National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, we shine a light on this violation of the basic human right to be free from violence and abuse, pledge to ensure every victim of domestic violence knows they are not alone, and foster supportive communities that help survivors seek justice and enjoy full and healthy lives.” ~PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA~ 

REMEMBER: VOTE EARLY! 

tlochiiin-news

tlochiiin-news

Category: Social

Indigenous Peoples’ Day Wins Another State!

“Gov. Peter Shumlin of Vermont signed an executive proclamation Thursday, making the change. Under the decree, Shumlin said a growing number of cities in towns in the United States have recognized the second Monday in October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day.” B. Evans, NBC5

abolish-columbus-day

abolish-columbus-day

Excerpt: Vermont has officially changed Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Brad Evans, NBC5

“The day is an opportunity to celebrate indigenous heritage and resiliency, the proclamation stated…The State of Vermont recognizes that it was founded and is built upon lands first inhabited by the Indigenous Peoples of this region – the Abenaki and their ancestors and allies – and acknowledges and honors the members of the community, both past and present.

left-to-right-elnu-chief-roger-longtoe-governor-peter-shumlin-nulhegan-chief-don-stevens-fred-wiseman

left-to-right-elnu-chief-roger-longtoe-governor-peter-shumlin-nulhegan-chief-don-stevens-fred-wiseman

Shumlin encouraged all Vermonters to celebrate the new holiday… Town Manager Leo Pullar said the issue is important to many in the area.The Abenaki, one of the indiginous peoples of this area…culturally, historically have given great contributions to this area, said Pullar.

abenaki-lifestyles-and-traditionsphoto-abenaki-website

abenaki-lifestyles-and-traditionsphoto-abenaki-website

takara-matthews-a-member-of-the-abenaki-sokoki-tribe in Vermont.

takara-matthews-a-member-of-the-abenaki-sokoki-tribe in Vermont.

The tribe has its own government and constitution.The push to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day began in 1977. It has gained in popularity in recent years.”

For Teachers: visit the site Warpath2Peacepipes which provides interesting facts, information and a history timeline of the Native American Indians of Vermont.

for-more-information-read-calloways-book-the-abenaki

A Special “Wado” to LJ Perspectives for helping the staff at Talking Feather!

See LJ’s beautiful Fetish art in our Native Tribal Art Work section

Category: Social

NetFlix: Bucking Bulls and Broken Bones

“Superlatives fall like thudding hooves in the Netflix documentary series Fearless available on Friday. Bull riding is definitely the most dangerous sport in the world. It’s the fastest-growing sport in America. Professional Bull Riders, whose 2015 season the series chronicles, is a global phenomenon.” M. Hale, The New York Times

Photo- dailymail

Photo- dailymail

Excerpt: Netflix’s ‘Fearless’ Explores the World’s ‘Most Dangerous Sport -By Mike Hale

“Between the entertainment-sports conglomerate WME-IMG and Netflix, the deep-pocketed streaming service, there was probably a lot of money available to produce four hours of television (across six episodes) about bull riding.

Fearless, directed by Michael John Warren, looks good and moves smoothly. The graphic design and music are several levels above those of the cable reality series in this genre.

Native Dakota Louis rides Maverick.-pbr

Native Dakota Louis rides Maverick.-pbr

There isn’t quite enough content to fill those four hours, though. The wary but amicable relationship between American and Brazilian riders provides some diversion.

Yet the competitions, including the season championship, aren’t terribly dramatic, except for the somber moments when paramedics have to be called into the ring.

But Fearless has one great ace up its sleeve. Nothing looks quite like the slow-motion footage of those eight-second (or shorter) rides.

Kaique Pacheco in “Fearless,” a new documentary series on Netflix that explores bull riding. Credit Alberto Gonzaga:Netflix

Kaique Pacheco in “Fearless,” a new documentary series on Netflix that explores bull riding. Credit Alberto Gonzaga:Netflix

Untitled

The riders become rag dolls, their bodies jerking and folding in seemingly impossible ways. Often there’s the grisly bonus of seeing them fly off the bulls’ backs and desperately try to avoid their jackhammering hooves.”

Photo-likalaugh.org

Photo-likalaugh.org

Category: Social

Obese Polynesian god in Disney film ‘Moana’ sparks anger

“Shortly after the release of Disney’s trailer for its upcoming movie Moana, in which Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson provides the voice of the demi-god Maui, mixed reviews have hit social media, calling the character obese and insulting to Polynesian culture.” V. Schilling, ICTMN

Disney's Moana advert.

Disney’s Moana advert.

Excerpt: The Rock’s Husky Polynesian God from Disney’s Moana Gets Mixed Reviews Vincent Schilling ICTMN

“According to The Guardian, one woman on Facebook…(Tongan heritage), called Disney’s rendering of Maui half pig, half hippo.

When we look at photos of Polynesian men & women from the last 100-200 years, most of our people were not overweight and this negative stereotype of Maui is just not acceptable – No thanks to Disney, she wrote.

Dwayne The Rock Johnson provides the voice of the demi-god Maui, and is proud of his Samoan heritage.

Dwayne The Rock Johnson provides the voice of the demi-god Maui, and is proud of his Samoan heritage.

Others on Twitter have come to the defense of Maui and Moana – most notably Dwayne Johnson, who said he is proud and honored to share the movie’s trailer release.

Cecilia Sagote, the editor of SUGA a Samoan women’s magazine, told ICTMN via Twitter: The outrage on the depiction of Maui has been blown out of proportion and the uproar is not representative of Poly opinion. Pretty sure my ancestors were amazing, super-intelligent warriors. That’s why we are all looking fwd to celebrating Moana.Disney's Moana advert

Isoa Kavakimotu, a man from New Zealand who calls himself a pretty big guy, created a YouTube video in support of Maui. Kavakimotu said in his video that he was fine with The Rock’s portrayal, the size of the animated character and calls Maui a powerhouse who is capable of slowing down the sun, rescuing islands and fighting monsters.

Disney’s Moana is slotted for a 2016 Thanksgiving release and also features actress Auli’i Cravalho as Moana. The movie has songs and music by Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda, as well as Opetaia Foa’i and Mark Mancina.

Here is the official Disney Movie trailer:

For more information visit www.Disney.com/Moana

chris cruz @NerdyCruz: Moana character, Maui, gives a dark skinned fat guy, like me, a perfect cosplay opportunity. Thanks! @TheRock

Michel Mulipola @bloodysamoan: I’m not phased by the way Maui is designed in this film. In Polynesian mythology, Maui is the demi-god who inspired many myths and legends. In this film, he would of done a lot of those amazing feats…

Faitala Limā : Why is everyone mad at the way Disney portrayed Maui? He looks boss and full of character.

Chris Worthington: “…I am concerned that the critics are upset about the body image of the character. As a ‘person of size’ I find this a bit problematic, because I think good and intelligent and beautiful people come in all sizes. …if the problem is that you want a slimmer hero, that might be promoting another type of bigotry, and that is sad to me.”

Category: Social