2021: The Young Native Bull Riders Are Back!

“Professional bull riders Keyshawn Whitehorse and Cody Jesus find strong support from community.” T. Iannello, Cronkite News, ICT April 2, 2021

Champion Bull rider Keyshawn Whitehorse. Photo- pbr.com

Champion Bull rider Cody Jesus. Photo- pbr.com

Excerpt: ‘Mom, I want to ride some bulls’ ByTim Iannello,Cronkite News, ICT April 2, 2021

“It might have been the optics, but whenever professional bull riders Keyshawn Whitehorse and Cody Jesus entered the ring, the crowd seemed louder, more engaged. In fact, Gila River Arena appeared to shake at the sound of their names as they competed in the Professional Bull Riding competition.

Cody Jesus holds on to the opening gate as his ride on Mr. Clean starts in round 2.by Marlee Smith:Cronkite News)

Whitehorse and Jesus are both Navajo which has deep roots in Arizona. Whitehorse, 23, grew up in McCracken Spring, Utah, and is currently ranked No. 4 in the world, and Jesus, 22, is from Window Rock, Arizona. While neither rider finished in the Top 10 in the Valley event held earlier in March – Jesus was 17th – it was an ideal place for both riders to continue putting their mark on the sport…‘I think it was kind of destined to be in that area, to have that finish in Arizona and have such a fan base on my side,’ Whitehorse said…Traditionally, the love of bull riding is passed down from a family member, but that’s not always the case. Both Whitehorse and Jesus have atypical stories on how they began.

Glendale, Arizona; March 12, 2021. Keyshawn Whitehorse waves at fans and holds up his first event win belt buckle of 2021. (Photo by Marlee Smith:Cronkite News)

‘The way I got started is when I was little I was sleeping and my dad was watching it on TV one night and I just woke up and sat by him and I was watching it for a while, didn’t say much. And then after a while I told him, ‘I want to do that,’ Whitehorse said.

The next day, Whitehorse’s dad went out and bought him spurs, boots, chaps and a cowboy hat…“Then I heard some guys talking about some bull riding and I always liked it growing up, so I woke up one day and said, ‘Mom I want to ride some bulls.’ She said, ‘I think that is the craziest thing ever.’

Aside from atypical starts into bull riding, Whitehorse and Jesus have something else in common. They are both Navajo, which spans across three states in the Four Corners area…Jesus, who missed all of 2020 with groin injuries, is tied for 69th in the world and making strides to move up the rankings. The energy and support he receives from the Navajo Nation is incalculable.

‘Man, it means the world to me, it ain’t too far. And everybody kind of knows everybody around my reservation,’ Jesus said. ‘So it means a lot. They’re just like family.”

COVID-19 Vaccine and Financial Aid Sources

Indian Health Services (IHS): COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution List https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/distribution/

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Center for Disease and Control (CDC): COVID Data Tracker https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

Indian Health Services (IHS): Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/

Category: Culture, Sports | Tags:

Sacred Prayer Stone Returned to Kaw Nation!

“In an effort to right one of the wrongs of Lawrence’s past, city leaders have officially committed to returning a sacred prayer rock to the Kaw Nation and to issue a formal apology for its removal from the tribe’s homeland decades ago.” R. Valverde,  Lawrence Journal-World, March 16, 2021

photo by- Kim Callahan:Journal-World

The Shunganunga boulder, pictured Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2020, is a 23-ton red quartzite rock that sits in Robinson Park in downtown Lawrence across from City Hall. In 1929, a group of Lawrence officials arranged to take the boulder from the Shunganunga Creek near Tecumseh, where the creek joins with the Kansas River — a site that was sacred to the Kanza tribe. – R. Valverde,Lawrence Journal-World,

Excerpt: Lawrence City Commission approves resolution committing to unconditional return of sacred prayer rock to Kaw Nation, By Rochelle Valverde, Lawrence Journal-World, March 16, 2021

“As part of its meeting Tuesday, the Lawrence City Commission voted unanimously to adopt a joint resolution with Douglas County to offer a formal apology to the people of the Kaw Nation for appropriating and defacing the sacred rock, In ́zhúje ́waxóbe, and agreeing to its return to the Kaw Nation ‘without conditions.’

Commissioners expressed strong support for In ́zhúje ́waxóbe’s return to the tribe, and some noted that many in the community have also expressed support, with some elementary school children raising money to help pay for the rock’s relocation…As it has been for more than 90 years, the 23-ton red quartzite boulder is currently in Robinson Park across from City Hall, 6 E. Sixth St. In 1929, a group of Lawrence officials and community members arranged to take the boulder from its longtime resting place along the Shunganunga Creek, according to newspaper archives reviewed by the Journal-World. The boulder was then fitted with a plaque and made into a monument honoring white settlers who founded the city and placed in the park, which is owned by the county.

The resolution approved Tuesday is in response to a formal request for the rock’s return that the Kaw Nation issued at the end of November. A letter from Kaw Nation Chairwoman Lynn Williams informed the commission that at the Kaw Nation General Council meeting in October, Kaw citizens overwhelmingly voted in favor of bringing In ́zhúje ́waxóbe back to the tribe, as the Journal-World previously reported… Kaw Nation Vice Chairman James Pepper Henry told the commission that the nation was grateful for the commission’s confirmation of the tribe’s claim and agreement for the rock’s unconditional return.  He said the tribe appreciated the outpouring of support from the community and was looking forward to continuing to work with the city on the prayer rock’s return to the tribe.”

 

Kno-Shr, Kansa Chief, 1853

To Learn More About The Kaw Nation visit Wikipedia

[Wado L.J. 🙌🏽  ~TF]

 

COVID-19 RECOVERY PROGRAMS

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These are the funding opportunities currently available

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Indian Health Services (IHS): COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution List https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/distribution/

Center for Disease and Control (CDC): COVID Data Tracker https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

Indian Health Services (IHS): Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/

Natives “Thank” President Joe Biden for Covid-19 Funding

“Ahéhee’, President Joe Biden! The United States has made a huge rent payment to indigenous peoples of the United States in the form of the American Rescue Plan recently signed into law.” J. G. Watts, The Navajo Times, Mar 25, 2021

U.S. President Joe Biden signs the American Rescue Plan, a coronavirus relief package, in the Oval Office of the White House on March 11, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Excerpt: From “Letters to the Times”Rent is Paid; thank you Joe! By John G. Watts, The Navajo Times, Mar 25, 2021

“My wife likes to say, “Rent is due!” when discussing the federal government’s responsibility to Native communities, and that rent has been adding up since 1492…The [2021] American Rescue Plan covers:

Tribal governments, $20 billion;

• Native health care, $6 billion;

• Tribal housing, $1.2 billion;

• Native education, $1.1 billion;

• Bureau of Indian Affairs, $900 million;

• Tribal infrastructure, $600 million;

• Native languages, $20 million; 

• Combat domestic violence, $19 million.

That’s not all. There’s much more in the bill for all American families, including Native Americans…Ahéhee’ to my representatives in Congress who supported the American Rescue Plan: Democratic Rep.Tom O’Halleran and Democratic senators Kyrsten Sinema and Mark Kelley.” ~John G. Watts, Teec Nos Pos, Ariz.~

COVID-19 RESOURCES FOR NATIVE AMERICANS

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/public_indian_housing/ih/Covid_Recovery

Apply for NCAI Relief Funding https://www.ncai.org/Covid-19/Get-Involved/apply-for-ncai-funding

Indian Health Services (IHS): COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution List: https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/distribution/

Center for Disease and Control (CDC): COVID Data Tracker: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

Indian Health Services (IHS): Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) regarding the COVID-19 Vaccine: https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/

 

Navajo Nation Reopens 2 casinos–with Safety Measures in Place

Two casinos on the Navajo Nation will reopen this week as the tribe eases its restrictions on businesses amid a downturn in coronavirus cases and high rates of vaccination. All employees must test negative for COVID-19 before they return to work and be retested at least every two weeks.” F. Fonseca, ICT, March 17, 2021

Navajo Fire Rock Casino in Gallup, NM

 

Excerpt: By Felicia Fonseca, ICT, March 17, 2021

“The Navajo Nation Gaming Enterprise has four casinos but will open only two Friday and limit patrons to those who live on the vast reservation that stretches into New Mexico, Arizona and Utah.

Robert Peterson from Thoreau said Friday he’s happy Fire Rock Casino has reopened. Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero

The enterprise will keep Fire Rock east of Gallup, New Mexico, and Northern Edge in Farmington, New Mexico, open for two weeks before determining whether to reopen two other casinos — one in northwestern New Mexico and the other east of Flagstaff.

‘What it’s intended to do is demonstrate that all our safety protocols, which we know are very, very comprehensive, are in place, the program is going to work and keep everyone safe, and then we can open it to a broader audience later,’ Brian Parrish, the enterprise’s interim chief executive, said Wednesday.

Northern Edge Navajo Casino, Framingham NM (Times photo- Cindy Yurth)

The casinos will operate at 25 percent capacity with no food or drink services and only within the time allowed by the tribe’s nightly curfew.

Service lights on the slot machines will let customers request that the machines be sanitized.

Smoking will be allowed only in designated outdoor areas. Social distancing will be enforced throughout the properties.

The casinos also are setting aside a couple of hours on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings for elderly patrons.

Customers must wear masks, get their temperatures checked and provide contact information if they needed to be reached later.

Handheld devices will be used to swipe driver’s licenses to ensure customers live on the reservation, Parrish said…The tribe is planning a virtual day of prayer Friday to remember those who have died and been infected by the virus.”

 

COVID-19 RESOURCES FOR NATIVE AMERICANS

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act

https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/public_indian_housing/ih/Covid_Recovery

Apply for NCAI Relief Funding 

https://www.ncai.org/Covid-19/Get-Involved/apply-for-ncai-funding

Center for Disease and Control (CDC): COVID Data Tracker: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

Indian Health Services (IHS): COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution List https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/distribution/

Indian Health Services (IHS): Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) regarding the COVID-19 Vaccine: https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/

NCAI’s COVID-19 Response Fund (Donate) With the generous support of our donors, NCAI is providing financial relief support to tribal nations affected by COVID-19 through NCAI’s COVID-19 Response Fund for Indian Country.

 

Category: Culture, Health, Navajo | Tags:

UC Finally Gives Respect to Native Man Ishi

“The University of California, Berkeley, has removed the name of an anthropologist whose controversial treatment of a Native man has drawn decades of criticism.” N. Brennan, ICT March 17, 2021

Alfred Kroeber (center) is shown with an Indigenous man he named Ishi, right, and Yahi translator Sam Batwa. Photo- UC. ICT

“Anthropologist Alfred Kroeber (center) is shown with an Indigenous man he named Ishi, right, and Yahi translator Sam Batwai. The photo was taken in 1911 in San Francisco, near what was then known as the University of California Museum of Anthropology. Ishi lived and worked in the museum until he died of tuberculosis in 1916. (Photo courtesy of UC San Francisco History Collection)”

Excerpt: Justice for Ishi: UC removes hall’s name, By Natasha Brennan, ICT

“The University of California at Berkeley has stripped the name of a controversial anthropologist from a science and arts building, drawing praise as a ‘first step’ toward healing tensions with tribes and Indigenous students but reigniting criticisms over slow repatriation of Native remains.

For more than 50 years, the building carried the name of Alfred Louis Kroeber, a cultural anthropologist whose research in the early 1900s influenced the study of California tribes for decades.

But his involvement in the exhumation and collection of Indigenous remains and his treatment of a Native man called Ishi – dubbed ‘the last wild Indian in the United States’ – brought growing demands on Berkeley to remove his name.

An unidentified workman takes down lettering from a University of California, Berkeley building on Jan. 26, 2021

Joining the call for removal were leaders of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe, whose unceded lands are now home to UC Berkeley. Kroeber, who taught at Berkeley for 45 years, erroneously declared the Ohlone tribe to be culturally extinct in 1925, prompting the Bureau of Indian Affairs to remove the tribe’s federally recognized status and forcing members to vacate their protected land…Indigenous student groups praised the committee’s unanimous decision to ‘unname’ the building..Kroeber was the university’s first faculty member in the newly formed Anthropology Department, moving west in 1901 to the San Francisco area at age 25…Ishi apparently surfaced near Oroville, California in 1911, when, alone and emaciated, he was arrested by police for a string of food thefts. Kroeber and UC faculty convinced authorities to release him into their custody.

The man did not give Kroeber his name, but was called ‘Ishi,’ meaning ‘man.’ Ishi was believed to have survived the Three Knolls Massacre in 1865, when many of the Yahi tribal members were killed. He also survived another attack in 1908 that is believed to have killed his few remaining family members.

Kroeber, who by then was the museum’s director, proposed that Ishi be housed at the museum. Ishi worked as a janitor and as a ‘living exhibit’ for visitors, making tools and recording Yahi songs and stories, according to the museum’s website.

According to author Orin Starn’s 2004 book Ishi’s Brain: In Search of America’s Last Wild Indian,Ishi wasdisturbed to be living in the museum among the ancestral remains. He knew of the research and autopsies conducted, and told Kroeber he wanted to be cremated and buried without an autopsy in accordance with his tribe’s traditions… The building’s controversial namesake has been a topic of discussion for years… Finally, in July 2020, the UC Berkeley’s Building Name Review Committee launched an official review of the arts and science building name after receiving an official proposal to remove Kroeber’s name. The proposal was signed by representatives of Indigenous student groups, Berkeley faculty and staff, and members of the school’s Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act Advisory Committee.”

Also in Indian Country:

“Anyone in Oklahoma can now get the Covid-19 vaccine, thanks to several Native tribes, By Harmeet Kaur, CNN, March 16, 2021 “Any resident of Oklahoma can now get the Covid-19 vaccine — but it’s not because of the state’s health department. Instead, Oklahomans have several Native tribes to thank. Last week, the Chickasaw Nation opened up Covid-19 vaccine appointments to all Oklahoma residents, regardless of whether they are citizens of the tribe.”Read article: H. Kaur, CNN

COVID-19 RESOURCES FOR NATIVE AMERICANS

Center for Disease and Control (CDC): COVID Data Tracker: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

Indian Health Services (IHS): COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution List: https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/distribution/

Indian Health Services (IHS): Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) regarding the COVID-19 Vaccinehttps://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/

For additional ONAP COVID-19 resources, please visit the ONAP COVID-19 Recovery Programs web page: https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/public_indian_housing/ih/Covid_Recovery

Apply for NCAI Relief Funding

These are the funding opportunities currently available.https://www.ncai.org/Covid-19/Get-Involved/apply-for-ncai-funding

NCAI’s COVID-19 Response Fund

With the generous support of our donors, NCAI is providing financial relief support to tribal nations affected by COVID-19 through NCAI’s COVID-19 Response Fund for Indian Country.

Get Vaccinated – Wear Masks – Stay Safe!

Category: Culture | Tags: ,

U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo Was Chosen for Women’s Hall of Fame!

Note: Scroll down for important Covid-19 vaccine information

“Joy Harjo has been chosen for the National Women’s Hall of Fame as part of a Class of 2021, the organization announced Monday.” ICT, March, 2021

Poet Joy Harjo

 

Excerpt: Joy Harjo chosen among 9 others for Women’s Hall of Fame, ICT March, 2021

“She was chosen among nine others including former first lady Michelle Obama, late NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson and late author Octavia Butler. The group will be inducted during an Oct. 2 ceremony in an in-person ceremony. It will also be live-streamed.”

Excerpt from Favorite Poem By Joy Harjo:  “She Had Some Horses”

She had some horses.

She had horses who were bodies of sand.

She had horses who were maps drawn of blood.

She had horses who were skins of ocean water.

She had horses who were the blue air of sky.

She had horses who were fur and teeth.

She had horses who were clay and would break.

She had horses who were splintered red cliff.

Read Complete Poem: She Had Some Horses By Joy Harjo 

COVID-19 RESOURCES FOR NATIVE AMERICANS-2021

Center for Disease and Control (CDC): COVID Data Tracker:

https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#vaccinations

Indian Health Services (IHS): COVID-19 Vaccine DistributionList https://www.ihs.gov/coronavirus/vaccine/distribution/

For additional ONAP COVID-19 resources, please visit the ONAP COVID-19 Recovery Programs web page

Apply for NCAI Relief Funding

Indian Country Covid-10 Response Fund

NCAI’s COVID-19 Response Fund (Please Donate if you can). With the generous support of our donors, NCAI is providing financial relief support to tribal nations affected by COVID-19 through NCAI’s COVID-19 Response Fund for Indian Country.

STAY SAFE — GET VACCINATED