“2020 Presidential Hopefuls Embrace Indigenous Movement Against Unwanted Pipelines”

“The Indigenous-led movement against pipelines, waged against Keystone XL and Dakota Access for years, has finally emerged as a critical component of the 2020 presidential campaign.” A. Agoyo, Indianz.com

Presidential candidate Cory Booker.

 

Excerpt: By Acee Agoyo, Indianz.com:

https://www.indianz.com/News/2019/09/04/presidential-hopefuls-embrace-indigenous.asp

“At least among Democrats, that is. Trump, who is running for re-election, and his Republican allies continue to support both projects despite widespread objections from tribes who fear negative impacts on their water, treaty rights and ways of life.

But for the party hoping to reclaim the White House, engaging in consultation with Indian Country isn’t enough. Tribes must have a decision-making role in pipelines and other energy infrastructure that affects their communities, several Democratic candidates for president are asserting as they seek the Native vote.

2020 Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. photo: Jim Watson :AFP : Getty Images

‘As President of the United States, Cory Booker will ensure that all people and all communities, especially those who have been traditionally left behind like indigenous communities, share in our progress,’ the U.S. Senator from New Jersey’s campaign told Indianz.Com on Tuesday…He is among several hopefuls who are promising to rescind the presidential permits for both the Keystone XL Pipeline and the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren. ICT

Both projects were approved by the Trump administration with little to no input from those affected in Indian Country. The final Dakota Access permit in North Dakota, for example, was approved while the leader of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, whose reservation lies next to the $3.8 billion pipeline, was on a plane on his way for a meeting at the White House. The meeting was canceled since the decision had already been made.

Likewise, the first time Trump approved Keystone XL, he did so without conducting additional consultations among tribes along the route in Montana, South Dakota and Nebraska. And after Indigenous activists won a major court decision, he simply went around the judiciary and issued another permit rather than address the deficiencies raised in the lawsuit.

Biden was part of the Obama Administration’s efforts to help Indian Country and he participated in the 8-year promise to meet with tribal leaders. (Photo- Vincent Schilling)

But the politicians hoping to go up against Trump in 2020 are embracing an entirely different approach. A Booker administration will ‘require free, prior, and informed consent from tribal nations for all future major energy projects on federal lands,’ his campaign said on Tuesday, echoing a concept advanced by Faith Spotted Eagle, a respected elder from the Yankton Sioux Tribe, during the recent presidential forum…’We have a collective responsibility and commitment to stop Keystone XL from being built and we will not stop,’ said Lewis Grass Rope, a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe who is hosting the Wiconi Un Tipi Resistance Camp on his family’s homelands in South Dakota as part of the Indigenous movement against the unwanted pipeline…Dakota Access likewise is back in the news even though it’s been up and running for more than two years.

2020 Democratic presidential candidate Julian Castro. Aug. 20. Sarah Mearhoff : Forum News Service

The operators are planning to nearly double its capacity, a move opposed by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, whose water resources, subsistence sites and sacred and historical places are impacted by the pipeline, which already carries more than 500,000 barrels of oil a day through its homelands in North Dakota…Like other Democratic candidates for president, Cory Booker’s environmental platform isn’t just about pipelines. Among other actions, he’s vowing to clean up every abandoned coal and uranium mine, including the more than 1,200 on the Navajo Nation and near the tribe’s homelands.”

Category: Native Rights, Politics