Category Archives: Animals

Several Important Messages for Our Native Families This Year🎄♥️🎄🌟

 ‘Navajo in the City’ is an informative, wonderful and cool site! Be sure to visit 🎄🌟

FROM:  Navajo in the City   Jinii Newz Channel 00

Re: Dr. Ruby; Rez Vet ♥️🐕‍🦺🐾 [DEC 2022]

LINK TO GO FUND ME FOR DR. RUBY  [December 5, 2022]

 

More Information about Rez Dogs

APTN to launch 24-hour rez dog channel!

A ground-breaking new channel will feature uninterrupted video of rez dogs, 24-hours a day, in their daily lives, the Aboriginal People’s Television Network (APTN) announced on Thursday. Walking Eagle News, ~2018~2022

 

My first Rez Dog, Page, defined the term with honor and grace. Steven Sable, Rez Dawg Rescue

 

What Is A Rez Dog? by Steven Sable

“Malian loves spending time with her grandparents at their home on a Wabanaki reservation—she’s there for a visit when, suddenly, all travel shuts down. There’s a new virus making people sick, and Malian will have to stay with her grandparents for the duration.Everyone is worried about the pandemic, but Malian knows how to keep her family safe: She protects her grandparents, and they protect her. She doesn’t go out to play with friends, she helps her grandparents use video chat, and she listens to and learns from their stories. And when Malsum, one of the dogs living on the rez, shows up at their door, Malian’s family knows that he’ll protect them too.” Beautiful book by Joseph Bruchac

 

 

 

MISSING NATIVE RELATIVES♥️🎄♥️

“The Albuquerque FBI Division on October 14, 2022, released an updated list of missing Indigenous persons in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation.The list, current as of October 11, has 192 names on it.The latest list reflects the addition of 27 names and the removal of 18 since the previous list was released in September…” ICT, Oct 17,2022

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“Growth Slows for Endangered Mexican Gray Wolf Population”

“The rarest subspecies of gray wolf in North America was listed as endangered in the 1970s and a U.S.-Mexico captive breeding program was started with the seven remaining wolves in existence.” S. Montoya Bryan, ICT April 14, 2022

Researchers fitted this Mexican gray wolf with a radio collar in 2018. They estimate about two dozen Mexican gray wolf packs live in eastern Arizona and western New Mexico. (Photo courtesy of Jenna Miller, Cronkite News)

 

Excerpt: Susan Montoya Bryan, Indian Country Today, April 14, 2022

“There are now more Mexican gray wolves roaming the southwestern U.S. than at any time since the federal government started to reintroduce the endangered species, wildlife managers said.

The results of the latest annual survey of the wolves show there are at least 196 in the wild in New Mexico and Arizona — the sixth straight year that wolf population has increased.

At least 186 Mexican wolves live in western New Mexico and eastern Arizona, authorities say. The wolves – a rare subspecies of the gray wolf – were all but wiped out by the 1970s. (File photo by Michael Hannan/Cronkite News)

But officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said the population’s growth in 2021 was tempered by higher than average pup mortality. Life was made more difficult for the wolves because of a persistent drought that has resulted in low precipitation and scant snowpack, the officials said.

‘We are happy to see the wild population of Mexican wolves continue to grow year after year,’ said Brady McGee, coordinator of the Mexican gray wolf recovery program. ‘The service and our partners remain focused on recovery through improving the genetic health of the wild population and reducing threats, while also working to minimize conflicts with livestock.’

Ranchers continue to have concerns about livestock killed by the wolves, saying efforts to scare the predators away from livestock — by horse riders, nonlethal shots fired from guns and flags put up on fences near cattle — have not been effective enough. Feeding caches for the wolves are also set up by officials to lure wolves away from livestock…’The disappointing lack of significant growth is a sign that this recovery paradigm is not working,’ Chris Smith with the WildEarth Guardians group said in a statement…Federal officials are expected this summer to finalize a new rule that will govern management of Mexican wolves in the U.S.”

Category: Animals, Culture | Tags:

Natives Help Save Nature’s Engineers

“The rodents are often considered ‘nuisance animals’, but they can play a vital role in maintaining healthy landscapes.” L. Sherriff, The Guardian, Feb. 23, 2021

A beaver is released on to a stretch of river in northern Washington that has been prepped for its arrival. Photograph- Morgan Heim

 

Excerpt: Believers: Native Americans promote resurgence of ‘nature’s engineers‘ — Lucy Sherriff, The Guardian, Feb. 23, 2021

“Molly Alves steps down hard on the edge of a heavy wire trap, forcing its sides open with her hands. With care she lays the poised trap, baited with twigs and branches, in a bracingly cold stream. Her target? A beaver. Beavers are often considered ‘nuisance’ animals on the US west coast and, if captured, are destroyed by animal control companies.

Beavers caught from around the Seattle area stay at the Tulalip, Washington, fish hatchery before release Photograph- Morgan Heim

But the beaver picked up by Alves is to be transported to Alves’ employers, the Tulalip Tribes, a nation in Washington’s western corner. This Native American community, and others, are at the vanguard of the ‘beaver believer’ movement, which holds that the rodents can play an essential role in maintaining healthy landscapes.

Beavers are known as nature’s engineers, due to their dam-building habits. For decades they have been hated by landowners, who dislike the animals’ tendency to fell trees and flood areas. However, their dams – although seen by some as a nuisance – help control the quantity and quality of water flow, while their ponds create habitat for numerous plants and animal species, including fish… Back in 2018, Washington’s Cowlitz Indian Tribe started on an ambitious project: to reintroduce beavers back into the Gifford Pinchot national forest, a wild region on the slopes of the Cascade mountains, as part of efforts to reclaim indigenous land management practices.

The animals had not been in the region since the 1930s, after they were trapped into near-extinction in North America during the 1800s fur trade…’Our culture and members depend upon a healthy ecosystem,’ says Phil Harju, the chairman of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe. ‘Beavers are a key species that enable the ecosystem to function properly.’The successes in Washington have been keenly followed by tribal nations further down the coast.”

Category: Animals, Culture | Tags:

Global Warming and Climate Change Are Affecting Kodiak Bears in a Bad Way

“Alaska’s Kodiak bears, also known as grizzlies, have been passing up their famous salmon hunts due to climate change.”J. Tetpon, ICT

Alaska Kodiak bear (Alaska state Fish and Game photo)

Excerpt:Global warming and climate change are real, and Kodiak bears are saying so, by John Tetpon, [Inupiaq] ICT

I’m a firm believer in global warming and climate change. There’s too much evidence that firms up that conclusion. Alaska’s permafrost is melting, coastal villages have had to move further inland to avoid being washed away by seasonal storms, and Kodiak bears are hanging out on the streets of that town longer and getting labeled ‘nuisance bears.’

Alaska wildlife officials in Kodiak are considering killing the bears if they don’t go into hibernation soon. That’s the word from Kodiak City Manager Mike Tvenge. That’s according to a news report from the Kodiak Daily Mirror. Biologists say Kodiak bears usually get into their dens by the end of October but some haven’t done so yet and are wreaking havoc among townspeople.

‘Kodiak Police Department is working closely with Alaska Department of Fish and Game to deter the bears from getting into the (trash) roll carts, but those efforts have had short-lasting effects,’ Tvenge recently told city officials. ‘The bears are now becoming used to the non-lethal bullets and pepper shots.’

Bears will eat trash. Credit- Michael Nichols, National Geographic

Tvenge also told the city council last week that state Department of Fish and Game officials working with Kodiak police will likely kill these bears, the Kodiak Daily Mirror reported.   According to Larry Van Daele, Kodiak Area Wildlife Biologist, Kodiak bears are a unique subspecies of the brown or grizzly bear and live exclusively on the islands in the Kodiak Archipelago and have been isolated from other bears for about 12,000 years.

There are about 3,500 Kodiak bears on the island and are the largest bears in the world. A large male can stand over 10′ tall when on his hind legs, and 5′ when on all four legs. They weigh up to 1,500 pounds. Females are smaller and lighter than males. Only one person has been killed by a bear on Kodiak in the past 75 years. About once every other year a bear injures a person, Van Daele said in a report.

According to a recent report, climate change can be tough on specialist animals, whose focus on specific foods may backfire as seasons shift…Alaska’s Kodiak bears, also known as grizzlies, have recently given up their famous salmon hunts due to climate change, according to a new study, but not because salmon are scarce. Warmer weather led a different food source to overlap with the annual salmon run, presenting the bears with an unusual choice between two of their favorite foods at the same time.

Kodiak bears are known for their famous salmon hunts. Credit- destination 360.com

While they love salmon, bears seem to want the other food even more. When it made an early debut, they left the salmon streams — where they typically kill 25 to 75 percent of the salmon — and moved onto nearby hillsides for elderberries…Data from tracking collars showed the bears were on nearby hills instead of fishing in streams. Hills with red elderberry seemed most popular, and a survey of local bear droppings revealed lots of elderberry skins and little sign of salmon. Kodiak bears are already big elderberry fans, but the berries usually ripen in late August and early September — the end of salmon season. The bears are used to eating these foods in order, switching to elderberries after the salmon are gone.

A brown bear with two cubs along the Cook Inlet. (Bob Hallinen : ADN)

But using historical temperature data, the study’s authors found that rising temperatures have been helping Kodiak elderberries move up their schedule… ‘As climate change reschedules ecosystems, species that were once separated in time are now getting a chance to interact — in this case the berries, bears and salmon. This is going to have large impacts that are hard to predict.’

Kodiak police say killing a bear in a residential area is not an easy task…Making the decision to dispatch a bear is not something ADF&G often endorses, as this does little to curb the fundamental problem of bears getting into easily accessible and unprotected trash.”

 

~Democratic Presidential Leader Joe Biden~

“2020 Election Live Updates: Democratic convention speakers will include the Clintons and Obamas, along with Sanders and Kasich. 

The big names will be augmented by testimonials from “from voters of all kinds — delegates, parents, teachers, small-business owners, essential workers, activists and elected leaders,” culled from “1,000 crowdsourced videos,” officials with the convention’s organizing committee announced on Monday.” The New York Times

The Democratic Convention Begins:  Monday August 17 — Ends Thursday August 20  Visit  The Democratic National Convention  Schedule Information Here

Kamala Harris Is Biden’s Choice for Vice President!

Biden taps Kamala Harris as his pick for vice president-New York Times

“A former rival for the Democratic nomination, she will be the first woman of color to be nominated for national office by a major political party.” By A. Burns and K. Glueck, The New York Times

Joe Biden with his VP choice Kamala Harris

From Indian Country Today (ICT):

Resource Sites for the COVID-19:

Are you a Native student whose college or university has been closed or switched to online classes? Visit this spreadsheet for resources involving technology in Native communities. It is updated by San Juan College’s Native American Center.

• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Basic information.

Indian Health Service

National Congress of American Indians

National Indian Health Board

COVID-19: Native advisories and event updates

Navajo Rez Dog Rescuer Up for $50,000 award!

“Growing up in Salt Lake City, Darrell McCurtain always looked forward to visiting his relatives in Salina Springs and Rough Rock, Arizona … except for the dogs. With their mismatched ears, multi-colored coats and legs that were either too short or too long, the rez mutts were fantastical creatures to McCurtain, who was used to seeing the purebred dogs in the city.” C. Yurth, The Navajo Times

Darrell, a Navajo tribe member himself, works to improve the conditions for pets on the reservations by working with the Navajo Nation, Ute Ouray Nation, Ute Mountain Nation. YouTube

Excerpt: Rez dog rescuer up for international ‘Unsung Hero’ award By Cindy Yurth, Navajo Times

“But so many of them were bony, limping, or worse — dead alongside the highway — that the young McCurtain would sometimes leave his ancestral homeland feeling depressed. McCurtain’s love of animals persisted into adulthood, and he found himself volunteering at Nuzzles & Co., a beautiful “rescue ranch” in Park City, Utah. Eventually he worked his way into a job as the shelter’s director of intake and community outreach. Nuzzles did a good job of pulling pets from nearby kill shelters, rehabilitating them and finding them forever homes

But McCurtain’s thoughts often wandered back to the reservation, where the shelters euthanized many more dogs than they saved and people often let animals out in the desert when they couldn’t afford to care for them. In 2014, McCurtain talked his bosses into making a rescue trip down to the Navajo Nation…’They were surprised at the need on the rez,’ he recalled.

Darrell and a rescue

McCurtain also wasn’t above using his status as a tribal member to make some connections and get Nuzzles into places the average tourist never sees…The rescue now visits the reservation once a month, and usually the Ute Mountain Ute animal shelter in Towoac, Colorado, as well, and fills up its van for the eight-hour drive back to the rescue ranch. If the crew sees a dog in critical need on the street, they’ll pick it up, but in deference to Navajo Nation law, they’ll usually pull from existing rescues on the reservation…Once at the ranch, they’re vaccinated, fixed, treated for fleas, ticks and parasites, and learn how to walk on a leash and be around people and other dogs before being adopted out…While on the rez, McCurtain talks to as many people as he can about the necessity of getting their animals vaccinated and spayed or neutered.

Generally, rescue is pretty thankless work. So McCurtain was surprised when, on one of his missions to the reservation,he [found out that ] he was one of five nominees internationally for Petco Foundation’s Unsung Hero award [and] the final winner would receive $50,000 for their organization… McCurtain said if he wins and Nuzzles is awarded $50,000, he’d like to put it all toward the rez dogs.”

To Vote (or adopt a pet) visit NUZZLES & CO.

 

Don’t Forget:

Democratic President Elect Joe Biden 2020

“When I announced my campaign one year ago today, I said we were in a battle for the soul of the nation.  One year later, that is as true as it has ever been. I believe we can and we will emerge from this crisis a stronger, better, and fairer nation. Together, as one America.”

~Democratic Presidential Leader Joe Biden~

U.S. Presidential Election: VOTE NOVEMBER 3,  2020

Resource Sites for the COVID-19:

INDIAN COUNTRY TODAY:

COVID-19 Tracker in the United States: Story summaries, lists of closures, resources. Last update5/16/20   Information Here

COVID-19 financial strain? Here are resources in 50 states

If you are interested in Indian Country Today’scontinued coverage of COVID-19, please feel free to access our continually updated Coronavirus syllabus.

(See related: Indian Country’s COVID-19 syllabus)

Where to begin?

After extensive research, the most comprehensive and user-friendly website for finding assistance from a multitude of programs is arguably Benefits.gov.

Basic information.

Indian Health Service

National Congress of American Indians

National Indian Health Board

 

Category: Animals | Tags: ,

Large Number of Feral Horses Dead on Navajo Land in Arizona

“Approximately 191 feral horses have been found dead in a stock pond on Navajo land in northern Arizona, according to Navajo leaders, who attributed the death to ongoing drought and famine. ‘These animals were searching for water to stay alive. In the process, they unfortunately burrowed themselves into the mud and couldn’t escape because they were so weak,’ Navajo Nation Vice President Jonathan Nez said in a statement on Thursday.” A. Vera, CNN

Approximately 191 feral horses were found dead at a stock pond on Navajo land in Arizona.

Excerpt: Nearly 200 dead horses found on Navajo land in Arizona, By Amir Vera, CNN

“Some of the horses were found thigh- to neck-deep in the mud at the stock pond in Gray Mountain, according to Nina Chester, a staff assistant for the office of the president and vice president. Hydrated lime will be spread over the animals to speed up decomposition. They will be buried on-site, the statement said.

The Navajo community in Arizona has had to contend with a growing feral horse population of about 50,000 to 70,000, according to the statement…Horses dying at the Gray Mountain stock pond isn’t new, Navajo officials said. It’s a seasonal issue.

An intense drought hit the southwestern United States this year, creating dry conditions in northern New Mexico and southwestern Arizona, according to CNN affiliate KNXV-TV. A drought emergency was declared for the Navajo Nation in March.”

Category: Animals | Tags: