Category Archives: Business

Navajo Model Starts Luxury Skin Care Line: “This Is My Beauty”

“Ah-Shi in Navajo means, “this is me, this is mine, that’s me”! Ah-Shi beauty…….This is MY BEAUTY luxury skin care brand is for the fearless and unstoppable souls who enjoy quality skin care products.” Ahsaki Baa Lafrance-Chachere

Ahsaki Baa Lafrance-Chachere has started her own skin care line, Ah-Shi Beauty.

Excerpt: ‘This is my beauty’ by Pauly Denetclaw, Navajo Times

“Ahsaki Baa Lafrance-Chachere grew up in Ganado, Arizona, where she had her kinaalda, played high school sports and eventually graduated from Ganado High. It was also where she discovered her love for entrepreneurship. ‘I saw the opportunity of making money at a young age,’ Lafrance-Chachere said with a chuckle. ‘My family is very traditional.’

So what I’d do was save all my good candy and I’d save it until it was movie time. ‘Then I’d make my own concession stand at my grandma’s house and I’d charge my whole family,’ she said trying to hold back her laughter. ‘I was a genius back in the day. I had no overhead. I got my snacks from the cracker jack throw and boom.’

Today, at 27, she’s a small business owner of a restaurant, Four Arrows western wear and recently Ah-Shí Beauty, a high-end skincare line.

‘Growing up and to this day, I’ve been dealing with my own personal skin,’ Lafrance-Chachere said. ‘We’re at war all the time. What am I doing so wrong? Do I need to put the achii down or what? I love my potatoes and fried everything!’

After years of trying skincare products that ranged from the dollar store to high-end skincare lines, she decided to try to make her own. So in 2014, she started her journey to creating Ah-Shi Beauty.”

Visit Ah-Shi Beauty here: https://www.ahshibeauty.com/about/

 

A Word From Native Boss Babe (Ahsaki Baa Lafrance-Chachere):

Ah-Shi Beauty

“As I sit here in my office, brainstorming about my next business move and mapping out my next color pallet for my new clothing line. I hold my Navajo Tea up close and close my eyes. I vision myself back home in Besh-Be-toh, AZ right now the reservation is getting lots of rain so I can only imagine the smell of the wet dirt and sage brush surrounding my home. I vision my little sisters, my parents, my husband enjoying riding in the open valley, my family and I remember why I am doing what I am doing. I am doing this for my future family (I do not have kids yet), my family, and my people on the Dine Reservation… I vision my business to be big enough to hire my people on the reservation and off.

To help the next generation of young business women/men and help them pave their way.  I hope to be one of their stepping stones to help them achieve their dreams and goals… To be a Native Boss Babe outside the four scared mountains is tough but it is possible. It requires a lot of work and faith. There will be walls that seem to never fall and let you by. So you will have to think creatively and find away to knock it down or just find another way around it. You will face fear that will make you sit back and intimidate you. But do not let that stop you, you can do two things: Face it and power through it, or get help to overcome it.

If you can vision it than you can achieve it. Believe with all your heart. Never let anyone tell you  that you cannot do it. Protect your vision. Remember your four clans make you who you are! Our ancestors fought to hard for us to settle with okay. Let’s strive for the stars, and never settle with okay but the best. ..   Now go get it. This what makes me a Native Boss Babe. My culture, my faith, and my passion to achieve my dreams and goals.” 

 

Category: Business

Natives Ask: What Is A Tariff and How Does It Affect Indian Country?

” Trump has launched a campaign to fight a trade imbalance against China because ‘China and other nations trade unfairly with the United States.’ The goal is to use tariffs (or the threat of tariffs since they have not yet occurred) to get China to back down on other trade issues. What does this mean? And, how will Indian Country be impacted?” M. Trahaunt, ICTMN

Photo depicting international trade. ICTMN

 

Excerpt:  What Is A Tariff? And How Does A Campaign Against China Affect Indian Country? By Mark Trahaunt, ICTMN

“It’s important to say over and over again that a tariff is fancy word for a tax. A tariff affects how much corporate consumers are charged for, say, steel from China that is used to make a car.

And in response to such a tariff — China will levy a similar tax on its consumers when they buy pork, making that meat more expensive in China…Each side will tax products and the result will cost consumers more. And the producers of those products will make less money.

That’s where Indian Country comes in.

The tax bill will be paid every time someone buys a product that’s on the list, such as a car. And, on the other side of the ledger, Native American consumers will benefit as the price of pork (and its competitor, beef and chicken) drop because there will be more supply on the market. But the producers, the farmers, will make less.

According to the National Congress of American Indians: ‘Agriculture is increasingly important to Native economies, representing the economic backbone of more than 200 tribal communities and witnessing an 88 percent increase in the number of American Indian farmers between 2002 and 2007. According to the Census of Agriculture, in 2007 annual Indian agriculture production exceeded $1.4 billion in raw agriculture products.’

This is the trade deficit — and the Trump administration’s goal is to shrink it. And there is evidence that this trade deficit impacts wages and job creation, especially in manufacturing jobs.”

Category: Business, Politics

Mississippi Choctaws Adding a New Casino!

“Mississippi’s only Indian casino operator plans to expand to a third site. The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians says it will open a casino on the reservation’s Red Water community, on the northern edge of Carthage in Leake County.”

Excerpt: Mississippi Choctaws approve plan for casino near Carthage The Washington Times

“The band operates two interlinked casinos just west of Philadelphia, as well as one at the Bok Homa community near Sandersville in Jones County. The Tribal Council voted 9-7 for the plan Friday, a news release states.

Golden Moon Hotel and Casino

Silver Star Choctaw Casino

The tribe says the new casino will open within a year in a 35,000-square-foot building featuring 500 slot machines, 10 table games, and restaurants. Chief Phyllis Anderson says the proposed casino will help generate more jobs and more revenue for the tribe’s growing population, which now has nearly 11,000 enrolled members.”

Visit Tribalpedia to learn more about the Choctaw Natives

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Tribes Gather to Block a Pipeline

“Horseback riders, their faces streaked in yellow and black paint, led the procession out of their tepee-dotted camp. Two hundred people followed, making their daily walk a mile up a rural highway to a patch of prairie grass and excavated dirt that has become a new kind of battlefield, between a pipeline and American Indians who say it will threaten water supplies and sacred lands.”  J. Healy, The New York Times

Tribes move to block pipeline. Photo-trendolizer

Tribes move to block pipeline. Photo-trendolizer

Excerpt: Occupying the Prairie: Tensions Rise as Tribes Move to Block a Pipeline — By Jack Healy, The New York Times

“The Texas-based company building the Dakota Access pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners, calls the project a major step toward the United States’ weaning itself off foreign oil. The company says the nearly 1,170-mile buried pipeline will infuse millions of dollars into local economies and is safer than trucks and train cars that can topple and spill and crash and burn.

“The Texas-based company building the Dakota Access pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners, calls the project a major step toward the United States’ weaning itself off foreign oil. The company says the nearly 1,170-mile buried pipeline will infuse millions of dollars into local economies and is safer than trucks and train cars that can topple and spill and crash and burn. But the people who stood at the gates of a construction site where crews had been building an access road toward the pipeline viewed the project as a wounding intrusion onto lands where generations of their ancestors hunted bison, gathered water and were born and buried, long before treaties and fences stamped a different order onto the Plains. People have been gathering since April, but as hundreds more poured in over the past two weeks, confrontations began rising among protesters, sheriff’s officers and construction workers with the pipeline company. Local officials are struggling to handle hundreds of demonstrators filling the roads to protest and camp out in once-empty grassland about an hour south of Bismarck, the state capital. More than 20 people have been arrested on charges including disorderly conduct and trespassing onto the construction site. The pipeline company says it was forced to shut down construction this month after protesters threatened its workers and threw bottles and rocks at contractors’ vehicles. Leaders from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, whose reservation lies just south of the pipeline’s path, say the protests are peaceful. Weapons, drugs and alcohol are prohibited from the protest camp. Children march in the daily demonstrations. The leaders believed the reports of pipe bombs were a misinterpretation of their calls for demonstrators to get out their wooden chanupa pipes — which have deep spiritual importance — and pass them through the crowd. The conflict may reach a crucial moment on Wednesday in a federal court hearing. The tribe has sued to block the pipeline and plans to ask a judge in Washington to effectively halt construction. The pipeline’s route starts in the Bakken oil fields of western North Dakota and ends in Illinois. There have been no moves so far to disband the camp or keep people from demonstrating. But Sheriff Kirchmeier told reporters that the demonstration had become an unlawful protest, and Gov. Jack Dalrymple, citing public safety risks, declared a state of emergency on Friday.”

But the people who stood at the gates of a construction site where crews had been building an access road toward the pipeline viewed the project as a wounding intrusion onto lands where generations of their ancestors hunted bison, gathered water and were born and buried, long before treaties and fences stamped a different order onto the Plains.

People have been gathering since April, but as hundreds more poured in over the past two weeks, confrontations began rising among protesters, sheriff’s officers and construction workers with the pipeline company. Local officials are struggling to handle hundreds of demonstrators filling the roads to protest and camp out in once-empty grassland about an hour south of Bismarck, the state capital.

More than 20 people have been arrested on charges including disorderly conduct and trespassing onto the construction site. The pipeline company says it was forced to shut down construction this month after protesters threatened its workers and threw bottles and rocks at contractors’ vehicles.

CJ Clifford, a member of the Oglala Lakota. Photo- globalnews

CJ Clifford, a member of the Oglala Lakota. Photo- globalnews

Leaders from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, whose reservation lies just south of the pipeline’s path, say the protests are peaceful. Weapons, drugs and alcohol are prohibited from the protest camp. Children march in the daily demonstrations. The leaders believed the reports of pipe bombs were a misinterpretation of their calls for demonstrators to get out their wooden chanupa pipes — which have deep spiritual importance — and pass them through the crowd.

The conflict may reach a crucial moment on Wednesday in a federal court hearing. The tribe has sued to block the pipeline and plans to ask a judge in Washington to effectively halt construction. The pipeline’s route starts in the Bakken oil fields of western North Dakota and ends in Illinois.

There have been no moves so far to disband the camp or keep people from demonstrating. But Sheriff Kirchmeier told reporters that the demonstration had become an unlawful protest, and Gov. Jack Dalrymple, citing public safety risks, declared a state of emergency on Friday.”

“They need to stay out… They don’t know where the burials are. They don’t know where the sacred sites are. I’m trying my best to keep the peace.” ~ Jon Eagle Sr.~ historic preservation officer for the Standing Rock Sioux

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Wampanoag Tribe Get Their Casino…Finally!

“The Mashpee Wampanoag tribe won a major victory in its quest to build a resort casino in Taunton on Friday, receiving approval for 321 acres of land to be taken into trust by the federal government…after years of negotiations and reviews, clearing the path for the tribe to open a casino on the land with or without a state gaming license. The tribe’s plans for the land in Taunton includes three hotels, an event center, restaurants, retail stores, and a water park.” N. Sigelman, MVT

Chair Cedric Cromwell of Wampanoags. Photo Wampanoag

Chair Cedric Cromwell of Wampanoags. Photo Wampanoag

Excerpt: Feds Approve Mashpee Wampanoag Land, by Nelson Sigelman, Martha’s Vineyard Times

“Under the state’s 2011 expanded gaming law and a compact negotiated with the tribe by the former Patrick administration, the Mashpee Wampanoag would pay 17 percent of gaming revenue from a Taunton casino to the state if it opens a casino with no other gaming competitors in the southeast region.

A rendering of the proposed Mashpee Wampanoag Casino. Photo- BostonGlobe

A rendering of the proposed Mashpee Wampanoag Casino. Photo- BostonGlobe

A commercial casino, should one be licensed by the Gaming Commission, would have to pay the state 25 percent of gaming revenue in taxes under the law.The Massachusetts Gaming Commission has the discretion to issue a license in southeastern Massachusetts to another commercial developer. If both the tribe and a commercial casino opened in the region the tribe would not owe any gaming taxes to the state.

Maspee tribe celebrates new casino deal. Photo capecodtimes

Maspee tribe celebrates new casino deal. Photo capecodtimes

This outcome establishes a land base for Mashpee in their ancestral homelands, and will afford the tribe numerous possibilities for self-determination and economic development.”

I wish our brothers and sisters all the best as they move forward on this positive path for their people.” ~ Tobias Vanderhoop~ chairman of the Aquinnah Wampanoag tribe.

Category: Business

1st Native-Owned Video Game: ‘Never Alone’

O’siyo. The first Native owned video game entitled “Never Alone” will be released this coming fall for all to enjoy. The setting is Alaska and the protagonist is young Nuna and her arctic fox. Players help Nuna rescue her homeland from an endless blizzard and many folklore characters. The inspiration for the game comes from the centuries-old stories of the Iñupiat people native to the region.

Never Alone. Photo: Gamezebo.

Never Alone. Photo: Gamezebo.

Excerpt: Alaska Natives Tell Their Tales in Never Alone By Jim Squires

“The stories of our fathers are rarely written down. What we know of our family, our past, and to a certain extent our culture has survived because of the tradition of oral storytelling. In some cultures this is more valued than others. For the Indigenous People of the Americas, telling stories is essential to the preservation of their culture and heritage.
So why not share these stories through a more modern medium?

The brave  Nuna. Photo: Kotaku.

The brave Nuna. Photo: Kotaku.

Never Alone will be the debut release from Upper One Games, a studio founded by the Cook Inlet Tribal Counsel in Anchorage, Alaska. They’re the first indigenous-owned studio in the US, and that’s a title they wear proudly. Never Alone tells the tale of a young girl named Nuna and an Arctic fox. Everything in the game is inspired by the folk tales of the Iñupiaq people, including Kunuuksaayuka, Manslayer, Blizzard Man, and The Sky People.

Never Alone. Upper One Games.

Never Alone. Upper One Games.

As you might expect the developers have a rich cultural history to draw from, and for most gamers this will be their first experience with Indigenous folklore.

Interactive mediums have the potential to be great teaching tools. If Arctic Natives can use video games as a way to preserve their culture and share it with the next generation of Indigenous Peoples (and the world), I’m all for it.

Never Alone is aiming for a Fall 2014 release on PC, PS4 and Xbox One with an expected $14.99 price.

VIDEO: Trailer Never Alone (Kisima Ingitchuna) [PS4/Xbox One/PC]

Video Link

“For thousands of years we told stories from one generation to the next. Our stories help us to understand how the world is ordered and our place within it, but what good are old stories if the wisdom they contain is not shared?” ~Never Alone~ ( Iñupiat Narration)

Congratulations!

Category: Business