Category Archives: Health

Several Important Messages for Our Native Families This Year🎄♥️🎄🌟

 ‘Navajo in the City’ is an informative, wonderful and cool site! Be sure to visit 🎄🌟

FROM:  Navajo in the City   Jinii Newz Channel 00

Re: Dr. Ruby; Rez Vet ♥️🐕‍🦺🐾 [DEC 2022]

LINK TO GO FUND ME FOR DR. RUBY  [December 5, 2022]

 

More Information about Rez Dogs

APTN to launch 24-hour rez dog channel!

A ground-breaking new channel will feature uninterrupted video of rez dogs, 24-hours a day, in their daily lives, the Aboriginal People’s Television Network (APTN) announced on Thursday. Walking Eagle News, ~2018~2022

 

My first Rez Dog, Page, defined the term with honor and grace. Steven Sable, Rez Dawg Rescue

 

What Is A Rez Dog? by Steven Sable

“Malian loves spending time with her grandparents at their home on a Wabanaki reservation—she’s there for a visit when, suddenly, all travel shuts down. There’s a new virus making people sick, and Malian will have to stay with her grandparents for the duration.Everyone is worried about the pandemic, but Malian knows how to keep her family safe: She protects her grandparents, and they protect her. She doesn’t go out to play with friends, she helps her grandparents use video chat, and she listens to and learns from their stories. And when Malsum, one of the dogs living on the rez, shows up at their door, Malian’s family knows that he’ll protect them too.” Beautiful book by Joseph Bruchac

 

 

 

MISSING NATIVE RELATIVES♥️🎄♥️

“The Albuquerque FBI Division on October 14, 2022, released an updated list of missing Indigenous persons in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation.The list, current as of October 11, has 192 names on it.The latest list reflects the addition of 27 names and the removal of 18 since the previous list was released in September…” ICT, Oct 17,2022

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WISHING ALL FAMILIES BLESSED HOLIDAYS! TALKING-FEATHER STAFF🎄♥️

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‘Indigenous Chef keeps Wampanoag Traditions Alive in Her Kitchen’

Sherry Pocknett, seen here with her daughters Cheyenne and Jade Pocknett-Galvin, is the owner of Sly Fox Den Too and a Wampanoag chef who specializes in cooking indigenous foods. Ryan T. Conaty, The Bostn Globe

“Chef Sherry Pocknett [Wampanoag Nation] owner of Sly Fox Den Too, cooks with sustainably raised, hunted and fished animals at Charlestown restaurant.”

Excerpt:By Jenna Pelletier Globe Correspondent,Updated September 29, 2022

“Chef Sherry Pocknett started cooking locally and seasonally long before the term farm-to-table became buzzy. A member of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, she has been foraging, farming and fishing since she was growing up on Cape Cod in the 1960s.

Chef Sherry Pocknett, owner of Sly Fox Den Too , remembers helping her mother in the kitchen when she was a little girl. Ryan T. Conaty, The Bostn Globe.

‘Our people have always focused on local food,’ Pocknett says. ‘In the fall, we’d have raccoon and rabbit. In the springtime, it was striped bass with fiddlehead ferns, sunchokes and wild ramps.’

Pocknett now shares her Indigenous culture through the food she serves at her 30-seat Charlestown restaurant, Sly Fox Den Too. She runs it with her daughters, Jade and Cheyenne Pocknett-Galvin. The trio make dishes including quahog chowder, venison skewers, and three-sisters rice with corn cakes.

Roasted rabbit with root vegetables cooked at Sly Fox Den Too Ryan t. Conaty, Boston Globe.

The restaurant is named after Pocknett’s father, Chief Sly Fox, Vernon Pocknett, who died in 1999. ‘He taught us everything,’ she says. ‘He took all of the tribal kids under his wings and taught us how to fend for ourselves in nature,’ she says.

Sly Fox Den Too

The  ‘too’ in the name references the fact that Pocknett’s Charlestown restaurant is actually her Plan B. Shortly before the pandemic began, she started raising funds to renovate a property near her home in Preston, Conn. She is still working on developing the project, called the Sly Fox Den Restaurant, Museum, and Oyster Farm, where she plans to cook as well as offer educational programming on Indigenous culture. But her progress has been slow.”

Some Hospitals Finally Include Native Medicine!

“The largest public hospital in Osorno [Chile] is finding new ways to incorporate Indigenous health care practices, such as having a machi help with delivery.” G. Dell’orto, ICT, August 19, 2022

Ana Maria Aucapan, left, a Mapuche machi, or spiritual guide, and Ingrid Naipallan, second left, perform Indigenous rites with a percussion instrument called a kultrun as Angela Quintana Aucapan begins her labor accompanied by her partner Cristian Fernandez Ancapan at the San Jose de Osorno Base Hospital in Osorno, Chile, Friday, Aug. 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Luis Hidalgo)

Excerpt:New ways to incorporate Indigenous medicine, By Giovanna Dell’orto,Associated Press, ICT, August 29, 2022

“In labor with her first child last month, Lucia Hernández Rumian danced around her hospital room while her husband played the kultrun, a ritual drum.

She turned down pain medication from the hospital’s staff to get massages and oil rubdowns instead from her cultural liaison, who had ceremonially purified the space according to Mapuche customs.’It became my own space,’ Hernández said.

The largest public hospital in the southern Chilean city of Osorno is finding new ways to incorporate these and other Indigenous health care practices. There’s a special delivery room with Native images on the walls and bed, forms for doctors to approve herbal treatments from trusted traditional healers, and protocols for ‘good dying’ mindful of spiritual beliefs…But they also restore a crucial spiritual component to health care, according to health professionals and patients at Hospital Base San José de Osorno.

Mapuche people account for one-third of Osorno’s inhabitants and eight of 10 in the adjacent province of San Juan de la Costa

‘It must be a guarantee – we take charge of the physical part, but without transgressing on the spiritual dimension,’ said Cristina Muñoz, the certified nurse-midwife who launched new delivery protocols that Indigenous pregnant women can customize and are believed to be the first in the country…To join both kinds of medicine is not easy. Many Indigenous people perceive public hospitals as yet another state institution that discriminates against their beliefs…But doctors and traditional healers say they can complement one another’s work by realizing that every expert only knows a fraction of what’s possible, especially when battling new diseases like COVID-19.”

  QUEEN ELIZABETH II HAS WALKED ON… SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

“Queen Elizabeth II, the UK’s longest-serving monarch, has died at Balmoral aged 96, after reigning for 70 years.

She died peacefully on Thursday afternoon at her Scottish estate, where she had spent much of the summer.

The Queen came to the throne in 1952 and witnessed enormous social change.

Her son King Charles III said the death of his beloved mother was a “moment of great sadness” for him and his family and that her loss would be “deeply felt” around the world.

He said: “We mourn profoundly the passing of a cherished sovereign and a much-loved mother.”  BBC

(April 21, 1926 – September 8, 2022)

A Native Cafe Helps the Native Chefs Fight Addiction

Café Gozhóó in Arizona uses the kitchen to teach therapeutic skills to those recovering from substance abuse.” C. Nowell, The Guardian, July 13, 2022

Chef Nephi Craig uses notes in the kitchen to help his staff build their skills and work as a team. Photograph: Ash Ponders/The Guardian

Excerpt: The Indigenous cafe using native cuisine to help its chefs fight addiction. By Cecilia Nowell with photographs by Ash Ponders, The Guardian, July 13, 2022

“Driving along State Route 73 in eastern Arizona, it’s wide open skies and a red rock landscape, dotted with ponderosa pines, juniper bushes, yucca and prickly poppies. Just outside the White Mountain Apache town of Whiteriver, the blue roof of a gas station appears.

David Williams, a chef at Café Gozhóó in Whiteriver, Arizona, works during the lunch rush. The cafe teaches its chefs skills to overcome addiction and to create traditional Indigenous cuisine. Photograph: Ash Ponders/The Guardian

Only, it’s not a gas station anymore. The sign that once listed gas prices now welcomes visitors to Café Gozhóó, a new restaurant celebrating Western Apache cuisine. Inside, executive chef Nephi Craig – who

is White Mountain Apache and Diné, the Navajo word for the Navajo people – slices corn off freshly roasted cobs to make Apache cornbread, a three sisters salad and soup stock…But Café Gozhóó, which opened last October, isn’t just a restaurant. It’s also a vocational training program at the Rainbow Treatment Center, an addiction treatment program operated by the White Mountain Apache tribe since 1976.

Chef Crystal Wahpepah on the power of Indigenous cuisine- ‘Native foods are overlooked’

Craig, who is 10 years sober, is the center’s nutritional recovery program coordinator, and uses the kitchen to teach therapeutic skills – connecting with ancestral foods, stress management, and teamwork – to people recovering from substance abuse… Café Gozhóó is also filling a critical gap in access to care.

Many mainstream recovery programs are located far from Native American communities, and they often lack counselors trained in culturally competent care.

In his own journey to sobriety, Craig said, ‘I would encounter white counselors that would tell me, ‘You’re predisposed to become an alcoholic as a Native.’ But as he got deeper into his own study of recovery he realized, ‘It’s therapy’s dismissal of our legacy of historical trauma.’

The dishes at Café Gozhóó ‘allow people to build a relationship with food’, said chef Nephi Craig. Photograph: Ash Ponders/The Guardian

‘We’re not too far away from that time in history where so many of our food traditions, parenting traditions, ceremonies, agricultural traditions had to be abandoned and almost lost because of so much conflict in the American south-west,’ Craig said.

Café Gozhóó’s mission isn’t only about supporting recovery from substance abuse, but recovery from historical trauma.”

Indigenous People, Organizations React to Overturn of Roe

“The Supreme Court issued final opinions Thursday after a busy term that included cases affecting Indian Country directly and indirectly. Perhaps the biggest opinion was overturning Roe v. Wade’s guarantee of the right to an abortion.” P. Denetclaw, ICT, June 30, 2022

Sarah Adams-Cornell, Choctaw, at the Ban Off Rally and People’s Hearing at the Oklahoma State Capitol on April 5, 2022. She co-founded Matriarch, a nonprofit that promotes the social welfare of Native women. (Photo by Allie Shinn)

Excerpt:  “We will never, ever stop having abortions’ By Pauly Denetclaw, ICT

The Supreme Court of the United States decided there is no federal constitutional right to abortion care for women and people who birth in a 6-3 decision of Roe v. Wade Friday morning.

Access to abortion has already been difficult for Indigenous women and people who birth, due to the Hyde Amendment that banned the use of federal money for abortion care.

Many Indigenous people rely on Indian Health Services for their care and the Hyde Amendment deeply impacted Indigenous communities’ access to abortion, forcing Indigenous people to drive hundreds of miles to access the care they needed.

‘We will never, ever stop having abortions. We will always be in control of our bodies. We will never succumb to a fascist, white supremacist government, no matter the cost. We will continue to help our communities access the care they need,’ said Indigenous Women Rising, one of the only Indigenous abortion funds in the country.

‘Our inherent sovereignty as Indigenous women and people determines that we must decide our own fate, and not allow the state to define these outcomes on our behalf. Upholding Roe v. Wade is the very least this country could have done, after centuries of the systemic oppression of anyone not white, male and Christian,’ said Ms. Foundation for Women’s Indigenous Women’s Advisory Committee in a statement.”

Tribal Nations Still Caring for Buffalos and the Land

“The Rosebud Sioux nation in South Dakota aims to build the largest Indigenous owned herd to help food security and restore the land.” M. Krupnick, The Guardian, Feb 20, 2022

The Wolakota Buffalo Range in South Dakota has swelled to 750 bison with a goal of reaching 1,200. Photograph- Matt Krupnick

Excerpt: Matt Krupnick, The Guardian, Feb 20, 2022

“A trio of bison has gathered around a fourth animal’s carcass, and Jimmy Doyle is worried. ‘I really hope we’re not on the brink of some disease outbreak,’ said Doyle, who manages the Wolakota Buffalo Range here in a remote corner of south-western South Dakota in one of the country’s poorest counties. The living bison sidle away as Doyle inspects the carcass, which is little more than skin and bones after coyotes have scavenged it. ‘If you don’t catch them immediately after they’ve died, it’s pretty hard to say what happened,’ he said.

So far, at least, the Wolakota herd has avoided outbreaks as it pursues its aim of becoming the largest Indigenous American-owned bison herd. In the two years since the Rosebud Sioux tribe started collecting the animals on the 28,000-acre range in the South Dakota hills, the herd has swelled to 750 bison.

The tribe plans to reach its goal of 1,200 within the year…With their eyes on solving food shortages and financial shortfalls, restoring ecosystems and bringing back an important cultural component, dozens of Indigenous tribes have been restoring bison herds. Tribes manage at least 55 herds across 19 states,  said Troy Heinert, executive director of the InterTribal Buffalo Council.

The pandemic, which has hit tribes particularly hard, added to the urgency of bison restoration, said Heinert, who is also the minority leader in the South Dakota state senate. The first animal harvested by Wolakota helped feed homeless residents of the Rosebud Sioux reservation…Although the words are used interchangeably, bison and buffalo are different animals. Bison – named the US’s national mammal in 2016 – are found in North America and Europe, while buffalo are native to Asia and Africa.

‘I used to be a stickler for calling them bison, but I’ve heard them called buffalo a lot around here,’ said Doyle, who is also a wildlife biologist. ‘I feel like it rolls off the tongue more easily, and it’s just fun to say.’

‘For Indian tribes, the restoration of buffalo to tribal lands signifies much more than simply conservation of the national mammal,’ said Ervin Carlson, president of the InterTribal Buffalo Council, at a House hearing last year. “Tribes enter buffalo restoration efforts to counteract the near extinction of buffalo that was analogous to the tragic history of American Indians in this country.’

While food security is most often cited as the reason for the recent interest in bison, tribes also hope that returning bison to the land will restore ecological balance. At Wolakota, for instance, bison have been eating the yucca plants that became plentiful after native grasses disappeared, tearing them up by the roots and allowing grasses to return. The grass regeneration increases carbon capture.”

Click here to see the tribes of the Intertribal Buffalo Council