Category Archives: Native Actors

Natives Honored for Film The Revenant, A Golden Globe Winner!

“Leonardo DiCaprio accepted the Golden Globe at the 2016 Golden Globes 73rd awards ceremony for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture his role in the film Revenant… he took a moment to thank the Indigenous community involved in the making of the film. ‘I want to share this award with all the First Nations people represented in this film and all the indigenous communities around the world.’ V. Schilling, ICTMN

 Forrest Goodluck as Hawk in The Revenant. Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation


Forrest Goodluck as Hawk in The Revenant. Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation

Excerpt: DiCaprio Shares Golden Globe …with First Nations People Vincent Schilling, ICTMN

During his acceptance speech DiCaprio paid the customary respects by thanking all of the cast and crew and his parents – and as the music began to play to usher him off the stage, he took a moment to thank the Indigenous community involved in the making of the film.

Native actor Duane Howard as Elk Dog in film Revenant. Photo-theprovince

Native actor Duane Howard as Elk Dog in film Revenant. Photo-theprovince

Duane Howard and Melaw Nakehk'o both star in film The Revenant. Photoedgyk.

Duane Howard and Melaw Nakehk’o both star in film The Revenant. Photoedgyk.

It is time that we recognize your history and that we protect your indigenous lands from corporate interests and people that are out there to exploit them.

Leonardo DiCaprio in The Revenant PA:Twentieth Century Fox

Leonardo DiCaprio in The Revenant PA:Twentieth Century Fox

The Revenant is a retelling of the life of the real Hugh Glass (DiCaprio). In the early 1820s a group of about 45 American trappers are camping in a wilderness forest in what is now Montana. They are a fractious and grim bunch. Their Hugh Glass is accompanied by his grown son, Hawk (Forrest Goodluck), whose murdered mother was a Pawnee Indian. More than 30 men are killed when Indians attack. Their chief Elk Dog (Duane Howard) is searching relentlessly for his daughter Powaqa (Melaw Nakehk’o) whom he believes was kidnapped by trappers. Glass, his son and a few of the men survive.  Glass is attacked by a mother grizzly bear trying to protect her cub. It is a horrid attack, made worse when Glass wounds the bear. Glass is barely alive when his men find him. A “revenant” is the spirit or soul of a dead person who appears to the living…”

“It is time that we heard your voice and protected this planet for future generations.”  ~Leonardo DiCaprio~

Category: Native Actors

Natives Protect Homeland Against Zombies!

“Native Americans and Zombies will come together on this Friday’s episode of the SyFy channel’s Z Nation. The SyFy series, which portrays a post-apocalyptic world filled with zombies, will feature Native actors protecting their homelands in an episode entitled, We Were Nowhere Near the Grand Canyon.” V. Schilling ICTMN

ZNation. Photo ZNation website

ZNation. Photo ZNation website

Excerpt:  Native Americans AND Zombies… Vincent Schilling, ITCNM

“Z Nation, a television series on the SyFy Network that portrays a cast of zombie-fighters who must transport a virus survivor from New York to California in an attempt to find a zombie cure, will be joined by Native actors Eddie Spears, Gene Tagaban, Tonantzin Carmelo, Tinsel Korey and Jeff Barehand.

Scene from ZNation. Photo ZNation website

Scene from ZNation. Photo ZNation website

Juan Mas, the director of ZNation told ICTMN they had discussed doing an episode featuring Indian Country previously but things didn’t work out. We wanted our cast to travel to the Grand Canyon and we wanted to introduce a Native American element Mas told ICTMN.

Youtube clip: Z Nation “We Were Nowhere Near the Grand Canyon”

ZNation. Photo-solarmovie.is

ZNation. Photo-solarmovie.is

In any production that portrays a culture, there can be assumptions made so we worked closely with Native actors to tell us if we did anything that might be offensive.  Mas says the story will focus on the relationship of a Native father (portrayed by Gene Tagaban) a Native son (Eddie Spears) and other family members and friends (Tonantzin Carmelo, Tinsel Korey, and Jeff Barehand.”

“Even though we are a production that likes to make fun of itself, we wanted to maintain respect for Native culture. I am a minority myself as a Cuban and Colombian,” ~ Juan Mas~ Director of ZNation

For more information Visit ZNation website

“Our Hearts go out to the families of the innocent victims and to the people of Paris”

Hand written notes lie among flowers and candles at the French Embassy-

Hand written notes lie among flowers and candles at the French Embassy-

Category: Native Actors

Warrior (or Trickster) Russell Means ‘Will’ Be Remembered…

O’siyo. Russell Means,  a member of the Oglala Sioux  crossed over at the age of 72, on Monday October 22, 2012.  He was an Activist, Writer, and Actor. Some Natives claimed he caused trouble for American Indians and compared him to Old Man Coyote or the Trickster. Others worshipped him as a Warrior who drew national attention to the injustices  suffered by American Indians. Either way, Russell Means is an historic figure who will be remembered by all.

The Warrior- His Autobiography.

Excerpt:  Russell Means, Who Revived Warrior Image of American Indian, Dies at 72, By Robert D. McFadden, The New York Times

“Russell C. Means, the charismatic Oglala Sioux who helped revive the warrior image of the American Indian in the 1970s with guerrilla-tactic protests that called attention to the nation’s history of injustices against its indigenous peoples, died on Monday at his ranch in Porcupine, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. He was 72. The cause was esophageal cancer, which had spread recently to his tongue, lymph nodes and lungs, said Glenn Morris, Mr. Means’s legal representative. Told in the summer of 2011 that the cancer was inoperable, Mr. Means had already resolved to shun mainstream medical treatments in favor of herbal and other native remedies…Mr. Means was, by his own account, a magnet for trouble — addicted to drugs and alcohol in his early years, and later arrested repeatedly in violent clashes with rivals and the law. He was tried for abetting a murder, shot several times, stabbed once and imprisoned for a year for rioting.

Photo TRT

He styled himself a throwback to ancestors who resisted the westward expansion of the American frontier. With theatrical protests that brought national attention to poverty and discrimination suffered by his people, he became arguably the nation’s best-known Indian since Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse.

But critics, including many Native Americans, called him a tireless self-promoter who capitalized on his angry-rebel notoriety by running quixotic races for the presidency and the governorship of New Mexico, by acting in dozens of movies — notably in the title role of “The Last of the Mohicans” (1992) — and by writing and recording music commercially with Indian warrior and heritage themes.

He rose to national attention as a leader of the American Indian Movement in 1970 by directing a band of Indian protesters who seized the Mayflower II ship replica at Plymouth, Mass., on Thanksgiving Day. The boisterous confrontation between Indians and costumed “Pilgrims” attracted network television coverage and made Mr. Means an overnight hero to dissident Indians and sympathetic whites…Russell Charles Means was born on the Pine Ridge reservation on Nov. 10, 1939, the oldest of four sons of Harold and Theodora Feather Means…Russell attended public schools in Vallejo and San Leandro High School, where he faced racial taunts, had poor grades and barely graduated in 1958. He drifted into delinquency, drugs, alcoholism and street fights. He also attended four colleges, including Arizona State at Tempe, but did not earn a degree…Mr. Means retired from the American Indian Movement in 1988, but its leaders, with whom he had feuded for years, scoffed, saying he had “retired” six times previously.

They generally disowned him and his work, calling him an opportunist out for political and financial gain. In 1989, he told Congress that there was “rampant graft and corruption” in tribal governments and federal programs assisting Native Americans…”

Read the article in its entirety. Our condolences to the family and close friends of Mr. Means.

Category: Native Actors