Category Archives: Social

“Missionary’s Killing Reignites Debate About Isolated Tribes: Contact or Stay Away?”

“The recent killing of an American missionary by members of an isolated tribe on a small island in the Indian Ocean has reignited questions about the fate of the last few groups of people living off the grid…experts say they may not survive undisturbed for much longer.” E. Londono, The New York Times

A tribesman aiming his bow at an Indian helicopter in 2004, as it flew over North Sentinel Island. Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Excerpt: Missionary’s Killing Reignites Debate About Isolated Tribes: Contact, Support, or Stay Away? By Ernesto Londono, The New York Times

“In an era when people across the globe are hyper-connected by technology and increasingly interlocked economies, the survival of a few dozen groups of hunter-gatherers living in complete isolation may seem extraordinary. Because most of these groups are small and highly vulnerable, anthropologists and indigenous activists have been debating whether it makes more sense to leave them alone — or try to establish contact with them to offer basic medical care, such as vaccines.

Members of an isolated tribe in the Amazon basin, where most such groups live. G. Miranda-Funai:Survival International

Here are some basic facts about the world’s remaining isolated tribes.

How many are there, and where?

Anthropologists and activists who study the issue say it’s hard to know for certain. But based on satellite images and field research, experts believe there are more than 100 communities living in isolation. The only relatively large community outside of South America belongs to the Sentinelese, who live on North Sentinel Island. It is nominally part of India, but technically a sovereign territory.

That is where John Allen Chau, the American, was killed on a mission to convert the local residents to Christianity.

Why do these communities choose to remain isolated?

Based on accounts from people who have ceased living in isolation, and those who have had fleeting contact with these societies, experts say members of these communities are fearful that contact with outsiders would bring disease and mistreatment.

‘Many tribes in the frontier region of Brazil and Peru are probably survivors of the rubber boom who witnessed the enslavement and atrocities against indigenous peoples and fled to the headwaters of the Amazon to evade capture,’ said Jonathan Mazower, an expert on isolated communities at Survival, a London-based organization that advocates greater protection for the groups. ‘The historical memory of this era is likely to have been passed down to the current generation,’ he said.

Are these communities endangered?

Loggers, miners, cattle ranchers and drug traffickers have encroached on the territories of these groups, exposing them to violence and disease.

Anthropologists at the University of Missouri who study the size and resilience of these groups, based on satellite images and photos shot from aircraft, classify the ones they track as either ‘vulnerable’ or’critical.’

Is there a safe, ethical way to contact and support indigenous people?

Robert Walker and Kim Hill, two prominent anthropologists who study isolated societies, argued in an essay published in 2015 that it was time to reconsider the no-contact policy that governments like Brazil and Peru have maintained in recent years…Mr. Walker and Mr. Hill wrote in the essay, published in the magazine Science. ‘Disease epidemics, compounded by demographic variability and inbreeding effects, makes the disappearance of small, isolated groups very probable in the near future.’

Survival disagrees, and instead calls on governments to redouble efforts to keep outsiders from the territories where these communities live.

‘These uncontacted peoples make a judgment that they are better off remaining uncontacted and independent, fending for themselves,’ Mr. Mazower said. ‘Where their lands are protected and their right to remain uncontacted is upheld, they live healthy lives and are totally self-sufficient.’

Category: Native Rights, Social

Sioux Nation Welcomes NBA Star Kyrie Irving Home

“NBA all-star Kyrie Irving will be honored in a homecoming ceremony on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation on Thursday, August 23, 2018 at the Prairie Knights Pavilion. The celebration and ceremony will begin at 9:00 a.m. and will include a naming ceremony, performances, and a community feed. This event is open to the public.” L. Rickert, Native News Net

Boston Celtic point guard Kyrie Irving, with an eagle feather tied to his hair [in honor of his Sioux mother] The Boston Globe

Excerpt: Standing Rock Sioux Tribe WelcomesHome NBA All-Star Kyrie Irving, By Levi Ricket, Native News Net

“Kyrie Irving is a professional basketball player for the Boston Celtics of the National Basketball Association (NBA)…As part of the Team USA basketball squad, he earned an Olympic Gold Medal 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro…The family connection to Irving comes from the White Mountain family (also known as Mountain) of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

Irving won a Olympic Gold Medal at 2016 summer games.

The White Mountain family comes from the Bear Soldier District, on the South Dakota side of the reservation. His late mother, Elizabeth Ann Larson, was adopted out of the Tribe when she was a child.

Irving’s grandmother is the late, Meredith Marie Mountain, who is a citizen of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. His great-grandfather is Moses Mountain and great-grandmother is Edith Morisette-Mountain. During the Standing Rock resistance to the Dakota Access pipeline, Irving gave his support to the Water Protectors.

Irving designed shoe for Nike N7 line to honor water, his tribe and his mother.

Irving recently released a Nike N7 shoe, that he designed, to honor the water, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and his late mother.

Additionally, he has a tattoo of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal logo on the back of his neck. Irving is very proud to be Lakota and to be from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

‘We could not be more excited, he has made us all very proud. To know that he has not forgotten his roots and is taking the time before he starts his basketball season to visit the People, his People, shows that Kyrie has great character and pride in his heritage,’ comments Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Mike Faith.”

 

*Sign up for  ESL Voices Free Lesson Plan Alerts

Get an email alert for new lesson plans and posts.

We do not traffic in advertising, so you’ll never receive anything from us but these alerts. We use MailChimp to collect email addresses and manage our alert mailing lists.

Email Address

https://mailchi.mp/74f6e93584ed/esl-voices-sign-up

Category: Social, Sports | Tags: ,

Arizona Border Patrol Car Hits Native…And Keeps Going!

“Tensions flared on Friday between federal authorities in Arizona and residents of a Native American reservation straddling the border with Mexico after a video surfaced in which a Border Patrol vehicle appears to hit a man from the tribe before driving away.” S. Romer, The New York Times

U.S.-Mexico border.

Excerpt: U.S Border Patrol ran over an O’odham man today By Simon Romer, NYT

“The video, which was recorded on the phone of the victim, a member of the Tohono O’odham Nation identified as Paulo Remes, spread quickly on social media after several tribe members and Indivisible Tohono, an organization focused on the impact of border policies, posted the footage on Twitter and Facebook.

Click here to see video on Twitter

‘They just ran me over, bro,’ Mr. Remes is heard saying on the video. He told The Arizona Daily Star that he was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment of injuries from the incident, which took place on Tohono O’odham land about 60 miles southwest of Tucson. Mr. Remes appeared to be standing in a dirt road facing the vehicle when it made contact, knocking him to the ground. Mr. Remes told the newspaper that the driver of the vehicle did not stop.

Leaders of the tribe have expressed opposition to Trump’s pledge to build a wall through their land along the border. Largely because officials strengthened security at other points along the border, the reservation of the Tohono O’odham has emerged as an important transit point for unauthorized immigrants and drug traffickers, leading to frequent encounters with law enforcement and the Border Patrol…Robert G. Daniels, a spokesman in Arizona for the Border Patrol, said the agency was not able to release the identity of the agent involved in the episode; the video seems to show the vehicle speeding away after the victim is hit. ‘All I can say is that this incident is under investigation,’ Mr. Daniels said.

Edward D. Manuel, the chairman of the Tohono O’odham Nation, said in a statement that the victim is 34 years old. Mr. Manuel, who did not identify the victim by name, added that the tribe’s police department was investigating the incident together with the F.B.I. and the United States Attorney’s Office.”

 

Category: Law, Social

Navajo Nation Demands Prez Addresses His Daughter’s Drunk Driving Charge!

“Karis Begaye, daughter of Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye and probably the second most powerful person in the president’s office, is now on administrative leave after being charged with extreme DWI on April 29. The announcement of her placement on administrative leave occurred on Tuesday, five days after the story of her collision with a semi-trailer near Flagstaff was first reported by a local television station. During those five days, the president’s office only issued a short statement after the accident, saying that Karis Begaye had reported the accident and that it ‘may have’ involved alcohol.” B. Donovan, Navajo Times 

Coconino County Sheriff’s Office booking photo of Karis Begay on April 22, 2018.

 

Excerpt: Karisgate heats up By Bill Donovan, Navajo Times

“The statement did not mention that she was driving a SUV owned by the Navajo Nation at the time of the accident and that the vehicle was severely damaged.

Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye (R.) and Vice President Jonathan Nez (L.)

After reports began circulating that she had received no disciplinary action and had even been allowed to use another tribal vehicle, many tribal members went on social media to protest, accusing the president of favoritism and failure to follow tribal law.”

Category: Social

Native Tribes Fight for Their Share of Sports Betting

“State officials from California to Connecticut spent last week maneuvering for control of the tens of billions of dollars in projected revenue from sports betting, and joining them was another group of powerful, and familiar, gambling operators aiming to claim their piece of the action: American Indian tribes.” Draper, Arango, and Blinder, The New York Times

Kevin Brown (left) chairman of the Mohegan Tribe, and Rodney Butler (rt.) chairmen of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Council. The Boston Globe.jpeg

Excerpt: Indian Tribes Dig In To Gain Their Share Sports Betting  K. Draper, T. Arango, and  A. Blinder, The New York Times

“For three decades, federal legislation has allowed the tribes to operate casinos dominated by slot machines and blackjack tables. Now, after a groundbreaking Supreme Court decision cleared the way for states to allow betting on sports, industry experts say what may become a yearslong fight over control of sports betting will hinge on the fine print of a series of gaming agreements between state governments and Indian tribes.

In Connecticut, for example, where two federally recognized tribes, the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe and the Mohegan Tribe, operate the hugely successful Foxwoods Resort Casino and the Mohegan Sun, leaders of the organizations have insisted they alone have the legal authority to offer sports betting, according to their compacts with the state. They say the state may incur a steep penalty if it violates those agreements…

Rodney Butler, chairman of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Council, said he had met with state legislators and representatives of Gov. Dannel P. Malloy to begin negotiations. ‘We have said, ‘We want to work with you,’ Mr. Butler said. ‘Let’s work out an arrangement.’

With billions of dollars at stake, such discussions are likely to represent some of the sharpest negotiations between the tribes and government officials since 1988, when Congress passed the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act. That legislation allowed federally recognized Indian tribes to offer casino-style games like slot machines, blackjack and roulette on tribal land. There are now 238 tribes in 28 states offering some form of gaming, according to the National Indian Gaming Commission. Betting on sports represents a small fraction of that amount, though industry experts say the court ruling will most likely allow that to increase significantly.

In California, dozens of Indian-owned casinos generate close to $8 billion in annual revenue, the most of any state, giving the tribes enormous influence over the gambling industry…Kevin Brown Red Eagle, chairman of the Mohegan Tribe in Connecticut, said that in the interest of expedience, he and his organization were at least willing to include the Connecticut Lottery Corporation and Sportech, the other two entities included in proposed sports betting legislation in the state, in negotiations.”

Category: Social

Natives Join March For Our Lives in Remembrance of Red Lake Shooting in 2005

“Hundreds of thousands of people came together Saturday as over 800 cities all over the world participated in organized #MarchForOurLives protests. The movement was spawned by the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last month in Parkland, Florida. The movement also honors any of the schools affected by shootings to include Sandy Hook, Virginia Tech, Columbine and Red Lake.” V. Schilling, ICTMN

March 21, 2005 — Red Lake tragedy.

Excerpt: Hundreds of Thousands Gather for #MarchForOurLives Protests  Vincent Schilling, ICTMN

“Cities that have had major gatherings of thousands of people include Washington, D.C., New York City, London, Amsterdam, Houston, Los Angeles and others.

‘The kids are leading the movement,’ said Democratic Senator Chris Murphy in a news release. Murphy is from Connecticut, the state where 20 children aged between six and seven were killed in December 2012 at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

In New York, marchers wore bright orange to represent the official color of a gun control advocacy group and walked toward Central Park. In Washington D.C.,  protesters held signs with with hundreds of messages and images of shooting victims…In Parkland, Florida, chanters shouted ‘Enough is enough!’

Barack and Michelle Obama released a letter to the students of Parkland, praising their ‘resilience, resolve and solidarity’ and said they helped ‘awaken the conscience of the nation.’

Former U.S. President Barack Obama

Barack Obama also tweeted: ‘Michelle and I are so inspired by all the young people who made today’s marches happen. Keep at it. You’re leading us forward. Nothing can stand in the way of millions of voices calling for change.’

In relation to Indian country, the #MarchForOurLives movement takes places 13 years after the Red Lake tragedy. On March 21, 2005, a 16-year-old Native youth Jeff Wiese shot his grandfather, his grandfather’s partner and several of his classmates and adult employees at Red Lake High School before taking his own life. Including Weise, 10 people died.”

 

Category: Social