Category Archives: Social

“Media Bias and Racism Are Still Killing Indians”

“The following is the text of a letter sent by Ian Zabarte of the Western Shoshone Nation to editorial cartoonist Michael Ramirez and The Las Vegas Review-Journal.” Indianz.com News

By Michael Ramirez January 28, 2019-

Excerpt :

“Yesterday, January 28, 2019, the Las Vegas Review Journal published a propaganda cartoon in derogation of Native Americans using a stereotype of Indian alcoholism. Racism is an abuse no matter how softly or funny media represent its abuse.

There is a genuine and pervasive failure of trust by the media to report the truth of issues concerning Indigenous people. It is media disservice to openness, freedom of information and democracy. The Shoshone people seek understanding and reconciliation and get abuse from the Las Vegas Review Journal. Similar abuse was reported in the recent submission to the UN International Convention on Civil and Political Rights as, propaganda in support of genocide.

The point is that media bias and racism kill Indians. In 1850, California passed An Act for the Protection and Governance of Indians that authorized Indian hunters to take Indian hands and scalps for $25 and make slaves of Indians found not working. Slaves were taken until they showed miners where the gold was such as in the case of a Shoshone tortured to give the location of gold at Rhyolite…Before any settler or miner saw an Indian, media propaganda was there.

Today, the media does not report Native American past exposure to radioactive fallout from US/UK secret nuclear testing and disproportionate burden of risk.

The Shoshone people cannot endure any increased burden of risk from any source including resumption of WMD testing by US/UK, plutonium disposal from the Savanna River Site, depleted uranium disposal, proposed high-level nuclear waste disposal at Yucca Mountain, coal ash uranium or fracking released radiation.

We should all be offended by genocide.

The motive for the US to is to defraud the Shoshone people of our property. The intent to commit genocide is the culture of secrecy because we will never know what is killing Indians in secret. Biased media does not help protect the Shoshone people by providing unbiased information of importance to indigenous people so we can take protective action.

Las Vegas Review Journal stop fanning the flames of hate and intolerance. We are all responsible for addressing genocide.”

Sincerely,

Ian Zabarte, Principal Man

Western Bands of the Shoshone Nation of Indians

Category: Culture, Social

Tribes Intend to Celebrate Grand Canyon’s 100-Year Centennial …Shutdown or Not!

“This is the year to GO GRAND as the National Park Service celebrates the Grand Canyon National Park’s Centennial acknowledging the canyon’s significant relationships with the park’s 11 traditionally-associated tribes. The celebration will be very Native-inclusive as the regions Tribal Nations have all been invited to participate. ” ICT

Canyons–Arizona–Grand Canyon National Park–1900-1940 : National Photo Company Collection.

Excerpt: Shutdown won’t stop it: Grand Canyon 100-year Celebration, Native American Style

“…The Grand Canyon is, by far, Arizona’s most-visited national park unit, and Governor Doug Ducey’s decision to use state funds to keep it open during the shutdown means that visitors did not have to alter their travel plans, and the park’s concessionaires—including the lodges and restaurants—could remain open. Tour companies, too, continue to do business at the Grand Canyon. While there are no federal employees counting cars at national parks right now, indications are that visitation to the Grand Canyon has remained strong through the shutdown.

The centennial celebration will take place on February 26.

Grand Canyon’s Native American Havasupai Tribe has been living in and around the South Rim of the canyon for 800 years.

‘The 100th year milestone celebration is a time for reflection on the past and inspiration for the future, honoring those who have called the canyon home for thousands of years,’ says Park Superintendent Christine Lehnert… While millions of visitors ooh and aah at the canyon’s splendors each year, others have quietly appreciated its beauty for centuries.

The Havasupai tribe has been living in and around the South Rim of the canyon for 800 years. Anthropologists say the Havasupai maintained life by hunting along the plateau during the winter and raising crops and tending orchards in Havasu or Cataract Canyon during the summer.

Recognizing the economic boon called tourism, the Hualapai opened its lands to the public 30 years ago, promoting it as ‘an untouched piece of land where the Grand Canyon could be experienced without the crowds found along the North and South Rims’.  Today’s quarter of a million reservation inhabitants fan out over some 27,000 square miles, most of it in northern Arizona that stretches west to Grand Canyon National Park.

The Grand Canyon is an iconic national park accessible from Kanab, UT

Also present are the Hopi people, one of the oldest-living cultures in documented history, who have resided for the past 2,000 years in the Four Corners region where Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado meet.

Other tribes that have roamed this territory and called parts of the Grand Canyon sacred areas home include the Zuni, Kaibab Paiute, Shivwits Paiute, and San Juan Paiute.

The canyon’s early inhabitants will play a big part in the centennial celebration with year-long special events starting with a Tusayan Community Centennial Celebration in February and leading up to American Indian Heritage Days — and Native American Heritage Month — later in the year.

The event, a celebratory occasion to kick off our centennial year, will feature Park Service and Grand Canyon Conservancy speakers gathered at the Grand Canyon National Park Visitor Center Plaza.

In addition to the speeches and musical performances, there will be free cake to enjoy along with the scenery and its centuries of Native American history.

Info at www.GrandCanyon.org

Teens Mock Native Elder During Friday’s Indigenous Peoples March

“A group of high school teens surrounded and jeered at Native American elder Nathan Phillips on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Jan. 18. The images in videos that went viral on social media Saturday showed a tense scene near the Lincoln Memorial.” The Washington Post

Nathan Phillips trends on social media.

Excerpt:  Teens mock Native American elder on the Mall-The Washington Post

“A Native American man steadily beats his drum at the tail end of Friday’s Indigenous Peoples March while singing a song of unity urging participants to ‘be strong’ against the ravages of colonialism that include police brutality, poor access to health care and the ill effects of climate change on reservations.

Surrounding him are a throng of young, mostly white teenage boys, several wearing ‘Make America Great Again’ caps. One stood about a foot from the drummer’s face wearing a relentless smirk.

Nathan Phillips, a veteran in the indigenous rights movement, was that man in the middle.

In an interview Saturday, Phillips, 64, said he felt threatened by the teens and that they swarmed around him as he and other activists were wrapping up the march and preparing to leave.

Phillips, who was singing the American Indian Movement song that serves as a ceremony to send the spirits home, said he noticed tensions beginning to escalate when the teens and other apparent participants from the nearby March for Life rally began taunting the dispersing indigenous crowd.

A few people in the March for Life crowd began to chant, ‘Build that wall, build that wall,’ he said.

‘It was getting ugly, and I was thinking: ‘I’ve got to find myself an exit out of this situation and finish my song at the Lincoln Memorial,’ Phillips recalled. ‘I started going that way, and that guy in the hat stood in my way, and we were at an impasse. He just blocked my way and wouldn’t allow me to retreat.’

The encounter generated a wave of outrage on social media less than a week after Trump made light of the 1890 Wounded Knee massacre of several hundred Lakota Indians by the U.S. Cavalry in a tweet…

In a statement, the Indigenous Peoples Movement, which organized Friday’s march, called the incident ’emblematic of our discourse in Trump’s America.’

‘It clearly demonstrates the validity of our concerns about the marginalization and disrespect of Indigenous peoples, and it shows that traditional knowledge is being ignored by those who should listen most closely,’ Darren Thompson, an organizer for the group, said in the statement.

Some of the teens in the video wore sweatshirts from Covington Catholic High School in Park Hills, Ky., which sent students to Washington to participate in Friday’s antiabortion March for Life event, according to an archived page of the school’s website that was taken down Saturday.

School officials and the Catholic Diocese of Covington released a joint statement Saturday.

‘We condemn the actions of the Covington Catholic High School students towards Nathan Phillips specifically, and Native Americans in general,’ the statement said. ‘The matter is being investigated and we will take appropriate action, up to and including expulsion.’

The diocese’s statement expressed regret that jeering, disrespectful students from a Catholic school had become the enduring image of the march…[Philips] said ‘It was an aggressive display of physicality. They were rambunctious and trying to instigate a conflict. ‘We were wondering where their chaperones were. [I] was really trying to defuse the situation.’

Phillips, an Omaha tribe elder who fought in the Vietnam War and lives in Michigan, has long been active in the indigenous rights movement. He said he hopes the teens will find a lesson in all of the negative attention generated by the videos.”

Category: Politics, Social

“Missionary’s Killing Reignites Debate About Isolated Tribes: Contact or Stay Away?”

“The recent killing of an American missionary by members of an isolated tribe on a small island in the Indian Ocean has reignited questions about the fate of the last few groups of people living off the grid…experts say they may not survive undisturbed for much longer.” E. Londono, The New York Times

A tribesman aiming his bow at an Indian helicopter in 2004, as it flew over North Sentinel Island. Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Excerpt: Missionary’s Killing Reignites Debate About Isolated Tribes: Contact, Support, or Stay Away? By Ernesto Londono, The New York Times

“In an era when people across the globe are hyper-connected by technology and increasingly interlocked economies, the survival of a few dozen groups of hunter-gatherers living in complete isolation may seem extraordinary. Because most of these groups are small and highly vulnerable, anthropologists and indigenous activists have been debating whether it makes more sense to leave them alone — or try to establish contact with them to offer basic medical care, such as vaccines.

Members of an isolated tribe in the Amazon basin, where most such groups live. G. Miranda-Funai:Survival International

Here are some basic facts about the world’s remaining isolated tribes.

How many are there, and where?

Anthropologists and activists who study the issue say it’s hard to know for certain. But based on satellite images and field research, experts believe there are more than 100 communities living in isolation. The only relatively large community outside of South America belongs to the Sentinelese, who live on North Sentinel Island. It is nominally part of India, but technically a sovereign territory.

That is where John Allen Chau, the American, was killed on a mission to convert the local residents to Christianity.

Why do these communities choose to remain isolated?

Based on accounts from people who have ceased living in isolation, and those who have had fleeting contact with these societies, experts say members of these communities are fearful that contact with outsiders would bring disease and mistreatment.

‘Many tribes in the frontier region of Brazil and Peru are probably survivors of the rubber boom who witnessed the enslavement and atrocities against indigenous peoples and fled to the headwaters of the Amazon to evade capture,’ said Jonathan Mazower, an expert on isolated communities at Survival, a London-based organization that advocates greater protection for the groups. ‘The historical memory of this era is likely to have been passed down to the current generation,’ he said.

Are these communities endangered?

Loggers, miners, cattle ranchers and drug traffickers have encroached on the territories of these groups, exposing them to violence and disease.

Anthropologists at the University of Missouri who study the size and resilience of these groups, based on satellite images and photos shot from aircraft, classify the ones they track as either ‘vulnerable’ or’critical.’

Is there a safe, ethical way to contact and support indigenous people?

Robert Walker and Kim Hill, two prominent anthropologists who study isolated societies, argued in an essay published in 2015 that it was time to reconsider the no-contact policy that governments like Brazil and Peru have maintained in recent years…Mr. Walker and Mr. Hill wrote in the essay, published in the magazine Science. ‘Disease epidemics, compounded by demographic variability and inbreeding effects, makes the disappearance of small, isolated groups very probable in the near future.’

Survival disagrees, and instead calls on governments to redouble efforts to keep outsiders from the territories where these communities live.

‘These uncontacted peoples make a judgment that they are better off remaining uncontacted and independent, fending for themselves,’ Mr. Mazower said. ‘Where their lands are protected and their right to remain uncontacted is upheld, they live healthy lives and are totally self-sufficient.’

Category: Native Rights, Social

Sioux Nation Welcomes NBA Star Kyrie Irving Home

“NBA all-star Kyrie Irving will be honored in a homecoming ceremony on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation on Thursday, August 23, 2018 at the Prairie Knights Pavilion. The celebration and ceremony will begin at 9:00 a.m. and will include a naming ceremony, performances, and a community feed. This event is open to the public.” L. Rickert, Native News Net

Boston Celtic point guard Kyrie Irving, with an eagle feather tied to his hair [in honor of his Sioux mother] The Boston Globe

Excerpt: Standing Rock Sioux Tribe WelcomesHome NBA All-Star Kyrie Irving, By Levi Ricket, Native News Net

“Kyrie Irving is a professional basketball player for the Boston Celtics of the National Basketball Association (NBA)…As part of the Team USA basketball squad, he earned an Olympic Gold Medal 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro…The family connection to Irving comes from the White Mountain family (also known as Mountain) of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

Irving won a Olympic Gold Medal at 2016 summer games.

The White Mountain family comes from the Bear Soldier District, on the South Dakota side of the reservation. His late mother, Elizabeth Ann Larson, was adopted out of the Tribe when she was a child.

Irving’s grandmother is the late, Meredith Marie Mountain, who is a citizen of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. His great-grandfather is Moses Mountain and great-grandmother is Edith Morisette-Mountain. During the Standing Rock resistance to the Dakota Access pipeline, Irving gave his support to the Water Protectors.

Irving designed shoe for Nike N7 line to honor water, his tribe and his mother.

Irving recently released a Nike N7 shoe, that he designed, to honor the water, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and his late mother.

Additionally, he has a tattoo of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal logo on the back of his neck. Irving is very proud to be Lakota and to be from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

‘We could not be more excited, he has made us all very proud. To know that he has not forgotten his roots and is taking the time before he starts his basketball season to visit the People, his People, shows that Kyrie has great character and pride in his heritage,’ comments Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Mike Faith.”

 

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Category: Social, Sports | Tags: ,

Arizona Border Patrol Car Hits Native…And Keeps Going!

“Tensions flared on Friday between federal authorities in Arizona and residents of a Native American reservation straddling the border with Mexico after a video surfaced in which a Border Patrol vehicle appears to hit a man from the tribe before driving away.” S. Romer, The New York Times

U.S.-Mexico border.

Excerpt: U.S Border Patrol ran over an O’odham man today By Simon Romer, NYT

“The video, which was recorded on the phone of the victim, a member of the Tohono O’odham Nation identified as Paulo Remes, spread quickly on social media after several tribe members and Indivisible Tohono, an organization focused on the impact of border policies, posted the footage on Twitter and Facebook.

Click here to see video on Twitter

‘They just ran me over, bro,’ Mr. Remes is heard saying on the video. He told The Arizona Daily Star that he was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment of injuries from the incident, which took place on Tohono O’odham land about 60 miles southwest of Tucson. Mr. Remes appeared to be standing in a dirt road facing the vehicle when it made contact, knocking him to the ground. Mr. Remes told the newspaper that the driver of the vehicle did not stop.

Leaders of the tribe have expressed opposition to Trump’s pledge to build a wall through their land along the border. Largely because officials strengthened security at other points along the border, the reservation of the Tohono O’odham has emerged as an important transit point for unauthorized immigrants and drug traffickers, leading to frequent encounters with law enforcement and the Border Patrol…Robert G. Daniels, a spokesman in Arizona for the Border Patrol, said the agency was not able to release the identity of the agent involved in the episode; the video seems to show the vehicle speeding away after the victim is hit. ‘All I can say is that this incident is under investigation,’ Mr. Daniels said.

Edward D. Manuel, the chairman of the Tohono O’odham Nation, said in a statement that the victim is 34 years old. Mr. Manuel, who did not identify the victim by name, added that the tribe’s police department was investigating the incident together with the F.B.I. and the United States Attorney’s Office.”

 

Category: Law, Social