Category Archives: Sports

World’s First Indigenous Olympics in Brazil: Fire, Feathers, Fierce!

“What’s billed as the first “indigenous Olympics” kicked off Thursday with a raucous cultural mash-up that saw grimacing Maori warriors, gong-bearing Filipinos and feather-crowned tribespeople from Brazil preside over a traditional fire-lighting ceremony.” LatinofoxNews

Indigenous from the Kibatsa ethnic group leave their headdresses on the sidelines of a soccer game at the World Indigenous Games in Palmas, Brazil, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015-Oct. 31, 2015

Indigenous from the Kibatsa ethnic group leave their headdresses on the sidelines of a soccer game at the World Indigenous Games in Palmas, Brazil, Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015-Oct. 31, 2015

Excerpt: World’s first ‘indigenous Olympics’ kicks off in remote Brazilian city. Latino Fox News

“The World Indigenous Games officially opens Friday, when Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is expected to attend a lavish opening ceremony in the games’ host city, Palmas, a remote outpost in the sunbaked heart of Brazil.

A Kayapo Indian attends the cultural festival of the World Indigenous.Photo- todayonline.

A Kayapo Indian attends the cultural festival of the World Indigenous.Photo- todayonline.

Indigenous participants from all over the world. Photo-digitaljournal

Indigenous participants from all over the world. Photo-digitaljournal

Tribal representatives spontaneously broke into traditional song and dance as the media and other indigenous peoples from as far afield as Ethiopia and Mongolia formed tight, flashbulb-popping, iPhone-snapping circles around them.

Members of the Brazilian Kayapo Metykitre tribe compete in a tug-of-war. Photo-the guardian

Members of the Brazilian Kayapo Metykitre tribe compete in a tug-of-war. Photo-the guardian

Tough competition- Members of the Brazilian Enawene-Awe indigenous group compete. Photo-dailymail

Tough competition- Members of the Brazilian Enawene-Awe indigenous group compete. Photo-dailymail

A Maori man from New Zealand dances during the opening ceremony. Photo-ibtimes

A Maori man from New Zealand dances during the opening ceremony. Photo-ibtimes

A phalanx of Maoris from New Zealand, looking fierce with wide-eyed stares and menacing throat-slicing gestures, appeared to stand guard over the knot of Manoti men from Brazil’s central Mato Grosso state as they labored over the fire, finally emerging triumphant with a flaming torch.

Indigenous Protesters. Photo; riotimesonline

Indigenous Protesters. Photo; riotimesonline

The upbeat mood of the fire ceremony contrasted with the palpable anger at a protest earlier in the day by a small group of Brazilian indigenous people denouncing what they said was poor organization and unnecessary spending on the games. Narube Werreria said she saw the event as a bid to cover up the real situation of Brazil’s beleaguered indigenous populations.”

“The government is using the event to cover our eyes and say everything is all right here…But everything is not all right.” ~Narube Werreria~Member of the Karaja tribe.

 

Category: Sports

Dine College Student Is Also a Rodeo Star!

“By all accounts, Delvecchio Kaye (Navajo) is just like any other first semester Diné College student, balancing his studies and personal life. What sets this 22-year-old freshman apart from his peers is that he is a rising star in the national collegiate rodeo arena. Delvecchio, a member of the Diné College rodeo team and first semester freshman, is headed to the College National Finals Rodeo (CNFR) in Bareback Riding, June 14-20 in Casper, Wyoming.” L. Tapahonso, Tribal College Journal 

Delvecchio Kaye (Navajo) Photo- Tribalcollegejournal.org

Delvecchio Kaye (Navajo) Photo- Tribalcollegejournal.org

Excerpt: Navajo Freshman Earns Spot at College National Finals Rodeo-Lori Tapahonso, Tribalcollegejournal

“He ended his freshman season in second place in the Grand Canyon regional standings, and 16th in the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association standings.January is the first time he set foot on the Diné College campus in Tsaile as a student, but it was not his first time at the rodeo. 

Delvecchio Kaye comes from a rodeo family. photo- Nativenews today

Delvecchio Kaye comes from a rodeo family. photo- Nativenews today

Delvecchio grew up in a rodeo family; his father was a bull rider and bronc rider. His early experiences in the arena included mutton busting, junior bull riding and steer riding. Eventually he found his event in bareback riding. When asked about his winnings, he shyly chuckles, I don’t know how many I’ve won, but I have lot of buckles at home.  His humility is what keeps him grounded.

Ultimately, his future goals include finishing his education with a degree in Diné Studies and to qualify for the National Finals rodeo. Being surrounded by strong supporters is one sure way Delvecchio will achieve his goals. His father continues to coach and support him, as do his friends, many of whom he completes against. We push each other to get better, even though we compete against each other, he says with a smile.”

“It’s good to see Delvecchio do well in school and in sports here at Diné College. We always encourage student learning first and [being an] athlete second.”

~ Jackson Craig, Diné College coach~

Category: Sports

The Boxing Champions: Pride of Their Nations

O’siyo. The Apache Gold Casino Resort in San Carlos, Arizona recently held its Native American Amateur Boxing Championships. The event was a three-day affair from July 5-7. The ultimate goal of these tournaments is to create a Native American Boxing team to compete in the 2016 Olympic games.

Native American Boxing Championships. Photo- ICT

Excerpt: Inside the Native American Amateur Boxing Championships By Tish Leizens, ICT

“Twenty-eight fighters from 11 different tribes won in the three-day 2012 Native American Amateur Boxing Championships event held at the Apache Gold Casino Resort in San Carlos, Arizona on July 5-7. The champions, male and female, from ages 8 to 34, competed in specific weight classes and five divisions, including senior, junior Olympic, intermediate, junior and bantam. The winners brought pride to the tribes of Navajo, San Carlos Apache, Chicakasaw/Cherokee, Chippewa/Cherokee, Assiniboine Sioux, Pima, Gila River, Acoma Pueblo, Blood Tribe (Canada), Choctow/Cherokee and Ute… The tournament was a significant first step to producing a national Native American team to tour and compete at an international level and at the Pan Am Games, with the ultimate goal of training world-class boxers in time for the 2016 Olympic games. Marvin Clifford, Sr., director of the Native American Boxing Council (NABC), said the Championships dated back to the late 1990s, with the last tournament held in 2004… Promoting amateur boxing as a safe sport and a huge benefit to the health and wellness of Native American youth are also among the goals of NABC. We want to encourage kids to be successful outside of the ring… emphasizing that health and boxing go together.” Read the article in its entirety to see the names of the individual winners for each tribe.

I just want to be an example to the people in my reservation that you can do anything you put your mind to…Let the kids know education is so important; it’s how I found boxing, you know? Just be a living example that anything is possible.” ~Mioshia- Yosh- Wagoner~
Category: Sports

In This Corner Of the Ring: Comanche Boy!

O’siyo. He has Comanche and Choctaw ancestry, and he is scheduled to battle Indiana’s Jimmy Holmes on July 16 for the vacant World Boxing Council (WBC) Continental Americas middleweight title. The fight will take place outdoors at the Comanche Nation Casino, located in Lawton, Oklahoma, Tahdooahnippah’s hometown.

George (Comanche Boy) Tahdooahnippah. Photo- ICTMN

George (Comanche Boy) Tahdooahnippah. Photo- ICTMN

ICT By Sam Laskaris  Comanche Boy Fighting for WBC Middleweight Title

“Tahdooahnippah is undefeated in his pro career and sports a 27-0-1 record, which includes 20 knockouts… The 32-year-old, however, sounds more excited about what a victory in this match could possibly do for his career…He believes beating Holmes and earning the WBC’s Continental Americas belt would boost him considerably and possibly give him a Top 30 placing in the organization’s middleweight rankings…”

In addition to being a professional boxer, Tahdooahnippah also helps his people by being a fitness promoter for the Comanche Nation’s diabetes program. He is an inspiration to young people every where. Tahdooahnippah demonstrates the importance of good health, and equally important,  a path that just might lead to a better life. Kudos to Comanch Boy! Read the article, and share your thoughts.


Category: Sports

Mioshia Wagoner: A Beautiful Winner All the Way!

O’siyo. The new “power-house” on the block is Mioshia Wagoner, member of the Navajo and Chickasaw tribes. She is also a graduate of Haskell Indian Nations University.

Mioshia Wagoner.Photo- kansan.com

Excerpt:

“Mioshia Wagoner, 27, warmed up with a little shadow boxing as she trained in the boxing facility at Haskell University on Tuesday, Jun 29, 2010, in Lawrence, Kansas. Wagoner is working on her masters degree in conflict resolution at Baker University. A graduate of Haskell Indian Nations University, she hopes to join the small ranks of great Native-American athletes by going for the gold in 2012. Last year, she boxed for Team USA at world championships in China.

She could also be one of the next Kansas City area athletes to vie for an Olympic medal. Wagoner, 27, trains at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, where she did her undergraduate work in American Indian studies. She went to China two years ago for the World Championships and brought home a silver medal for Team USA. he’s headed to the national boxing championships at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. She has not fought for nearly a year because of an injury.

Mioshia Wagoner wins silver. Native Village News.

Her goal: London 2012. For the first time, women’s boxing will be an Olympic event. She grew up on a reservation. Her mother is Navajo; her father Chickasaw. In junior high, she played quarterback on the boys football team. Her father tells the story that in the final minute of a tight game in which she scored the go-ahead touchdown, she then asked to play defense and clotheslined an opposing player trying for the winning score… She plans on returning to the reservation in New Mexico after finishing her degree at Baker University and later hanging up her gloves.  I have family there, and they’ve helped me so much.” 

Mioshia Wagoner. Photo- Native Village.

“I’m a Navajo woman,..I’m a student, a daughter… I have family there [New Mexico reservation] and they’ve helped me so much… There are problems there. And I have been given the opportunity to learn things so that I can go back and help. That’s what I have to do.” ~ Mioshia Wagoner~

Category: Sports