The Center for Native American Youth is Accepting Art Submissions

“The Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) is launching their first Creative Native Call for Art for Native youth 5 to 24-years-old. In addition, Native youth artists between 15 and 24-years-old can submit for an opportunity to be the cover artist for CNAY’s 2018 State of Native Youth Report.” V. Schilling, ICMN

CNAY : Gen-I

Excerpt: The Creative Native call for artwork By Vincent Schilling, ICTMN

“The Creative Native call for artwork is an initiative that supports young Indigenous artists ages 5 to 24-years-old and provides the opportunity to receive national recognition, funding for art supplies, and a $200 prize.

In addition to the overall submissions, there is an additional opportunity for Native youth artists between 15 and 24-years-old to be the cover artist for CNAY’s 2018 State of Native Youth Report. The cover artist will be flown to Washington, D.C. to participate in the reports release event in November.”

Art Submission and Eligibility Requirements

Art submissions must answer the question: What does Generation Indigenous mean to me? Submission photos and images will only be accepted electronically through the online Creative Native Entry Form. Submissions will be reviewed by an independent review committee, which will select one awardee from each age category: 5-9-year-olds; 10-14; 15-19; and 20-24.

Examples of submissions can include, but are not limited to paintings, drawings, photography, sculptures, and traditional works such as beadwork, carvings, and baskets. Artists can submit a maximum of three entries. Artists will need to submit separate forms for every entry.

Deadline and details

Artists may submit up to three (3) images of each artwork, displaying alternate angles and perspectives. Submissions are due at 11:59 pm Eastern Time on May 9th, 2018.

Click here for a complete list of Rules & Guidelines.

Click here to submit your art.  

If you have any questions, you may contact del.curfman@aspeninstiute.org.

 

As Chief Wahoo Logo Leaves Cleveland Indians Logo Supporters Get Angry

“For decades, community activists in Ohio have held demonstrations at the Cleveland Indians’ home opener to protest the team’s name and logo — a grinning, red-faced named Chief Wahoo that some consider racist. And in what has become another tradition, Chief Wahoo’s supporters have screamed back as they head toward the turnstiles at Progressive Field…. on Friday at Cleveland’s first home game of the season the confrontation was more crowded, more tense and more vulgar than usual.” M. Stevens and D.  Waldstein, The New York Times

ICTMN

Excerpt: As Cleveland Indians Prepare to Part With Chief Wahoo, Tensions Reignite, By Matt Stevens and David  Waldstein, The New York Times

“The heightened atmosphere was likely in part because of the team’s decision to stop using the Chief Wahoo logo on its uniforms beginning next year — which angered some fans when it was announced in January.

Cleveland’s baseball team is just one part of a cultural conversation that stretches across the sports landscape. Many people vigorously oppose the use of Native American names and images as mascots and insignias, saying they are demeaning or worse.

Protesters For the mascot. Slate

Several teams use such logos, including the N.F.L.’s Washington Redskins, the N.H.L.’s Chicago Blackhawks and the N.C.A.A.’s Florida State Seminoles. But some find the Indians’ caricature, which has existed in various forms since 1947, particularly distasteful. Philip Yenyo [is] the executive director of the American Indian Movement of Ohio. One video of this year’s demonstration, which was organized by Mr. Yenyo’s group and the Committee of 500 Years of Dignity and Resistance, has been viewed more than 110,000 times.

‘People think this is just now coming up,’ Mr. Yenyo said. ‘We were never covered before. All the other demonstrations were barely touched upon.’ In another video, also produced by cleveland.com, dozens of protesters yelled, ‘Seventy years of harming the Native American community is enough’; ‘Change the name, change the logo!’; and ‘Burn, Wahoo, burn!’

In response, some fans walking to the stadium hurled profanity-laced tirades at the protesters, along with ugly names and obscene gestures…Several flaunted team jackets, jerseys and caps emblazoned with the Chief Wahoo logo. One fan made whooping noises as she walked by.

Mr. Yenyo called this year’s rally ‘a little more boisterous’ than normal, but he noted that there were no arrests and no violence. But Mr. Yenyo said that was not enough, noting that fans should expect to see protesters again next season. We’re going to continue until they change the name of the team,” he said. We want the name gone.”

Category: Sports

Natives Ask: What Is A Tariff and How Does It Affect Indian Country?

” Trump has launched a campaign to fight a trade imbalance against China because ‘China and other nations trade unfairly with the United States.’ The goal is to use tariffs (or the threat of tariffs since they have not yet occurred) to get China to back down on other trade issues. What does this mean? And, how will Indian Country be impacted?” M. Trahaunt, ICTMN

Photo depicting international trade. ICTMN

 

Excerpt:  What Is A Tariff? And How Does A Campaign Against China Affect Indian Country? By Mark Trahaunt, ICTMN

“It’s important to say over and over again that a tariff is fancy word for a tax. A tariff affects how much corporate consumers are charged for, say, steel from China that is used to make a car.

And in response to such a tariff — China will levy a similar tax on its consumers when they buy pork, making that meat more expensive in China…Each side will tax products and the result will cost consumers more. And the producers of those products will make less money.

That’s where Indian Country comes in.

The tax bill will be paid every time someone buys a product that’s on the list, such as a car. And, on the other side of the ledger, Native American consumers will benefit as the price of pork (and its competitor, beef and chicken) drop because there will be more supply on the market. But the producers, the farmers, will make less.

According to the National Congress of American Indians: ‘Agriculture is increasingly important to Native economies, representing the economic backbone of more than 200 tribal communities and witnessing an 88 percent increase in the number of American Indian farmers between 2002 and 2007. According to the Census of Agriculture, in 2007 annual Indian agriculture production exceeded $1.4 billion in raw agriculture products.’

This is the trade deficit — and the Trump administration’s goal is to shrink it. And there is evidence that this trade deficit impacts wages and job creation, especially in manufacturing jobs.”

Category: Business, Politics

Navajo Ranchers: “We Need to Manage Feral Horses”

“The March 1, Navajo Times covered the feral horse issue (Hunt canceled, feral horses a growing problem, page A1). Here’s a response by a guy with the name of a horse. In 2013, I helped the Department of Agriculture with a horse roundup. We had a crew that rounded up horses in 54 chapters. That was five years ago. Why is the president just now stating, ‘We do need to implement a horse management plan’? The plan should have been done in 2013.'”The Navajo Times

Navajo ranchers wrestle a feral horse. High Country News

Excerpt:  Feral Horses…The Navajo Times

“He also stated, ‘Horse management plan includes castration, birth control and adoptions.’ The option is ludicrous. Sounds good but each animal will continue eating 32 pounds of forage and drinking 10 gallons of water per day. We need forage and water for livestock that bring us revenue. Rez ranch life has its challenges. Can’t speak for other producers but for me it’s too many wild, unbranded, unclaimed feral horses, followed by drought and open range.

Horses wait in a cement culvert along Highway 160 for a Navajo Nation agriculture horse trailer. Navajo-Hopi Observer

Trying every strategic planning to improve beef cattle business isn’t working. Open range is a terrible way to make a living raising livestock on the rez, financially that is. In the summer months I spend money feeding, watering, buying salt blocks and range cakes for my cattle.

But in open range, the major concern is many, many feral horses at Oakridge Wildhorse Country Ranch. Named the ranch for many feral horses that nobody owns. I have horses for ranch work; I don’t need more than three.

Feral horses deplete natural springs at Oakridge. I want to ask the guy from Betatakin to come get the feral horses. I’ll help with the roundup and trucking…BIA and Navajo Nation will continue blaming everything and everyone except the fact that they allow resource mismanagement to continue for almost a century.”

Category: Animals

Natives Join March For Our Lives in Remembrance of Red Lake Shooting in 2005

“Hundreds of thousands of people came together Saturday as over 800 cities all over the world participated in organized #MarchForOurLives protests. The movement was spawned by the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last month in Parkland, Florida. The movement also honors any of the schools affected by shootings to include Sandy Hook, Virginia Tech, Columbine and Red Lake.” V. Schilling, ICTMN

March 21, 2005 — Red Lake tragedy.

Excerpt: Hundreds of Thousands Gather for #MarchForOurLives Protests Regarding Gun Control- V. Schilling, ICTMN

“Cities that have had major gatherings of thousands of people include Washington, D.C., New York City, London, Amsterdam, Houston, Los Angeles and others.

‘The kids are leading the movement,’ said Democratic Senator Chris Murphy in a news release. Murphy is from Connecticut, the state where 20 children aged between six and seven were killed in December 2012 at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

In New York, marchers wore bright orange to represent the official color of a gun control advocacy group and walked toward Central Park. In Washington D.C.,  protesters held signs with with hundreds of messages and images of shooting victims…In Parkland, Florida, chanters shouted ‘Enough is enough!’

Barack and Michelle Obama released a letter to the students of Parkland, praising their ‘resilience, resolve and solidarity’ and said they helped ‘awaken the conscience of the nation.’

Former U.S. President Barack Obama

Barack Obama also tweeted: ‘Michelle and I are so inspired by all the young people who made today’s marches happen. Keep at it. You’re leading us forward. Nothing can stand in the way of millions of voices calling for change.’

In relation to Indian country, the #MarchForOurLives movement takes places 13 years after the Red Lake tragedy. On March 21, 2005, a 16-year-old Native youth Jeff Wiese shot his grandfather, his grandfather’s partner and several of his classmates and adult employees at Red Lake High School before taking his own life. Including Weise, 10 people died.”

 

Category: Social

An Offensive Native Statue Comes Down!

“San Francisco will take down a controversial statue depicting a submissive Native American man after an outcry sparked by a deadly rally last summer in Charlottesville, Va., led the city’s arts commission to vote unanimously this week to remove it. The statue, known as ‘Early Days,’ shows a Native American man at the feet of a Catholic missionary, who towers over him and gestures toward the ground…”  M. Gold, The New York Times

The sculpture shows a Native American man at the feet of a Catholic missionary. Credit Jeff Chiu:Associated Press

Excerpt: San Francisco Will Remove Controversial Statue of Native American Man — By Michael Gold, The New York Times

“Critics have called the statue racist and disrespectful, saying it promotes genocide, portrays Native Americans as inferior and relies on inaccurate stereotypes. (Among the specific critiques: that the person depicted in the statue is styled like a Plains Indian rather than a member of any California tribe.)

“It’s more than just racist,” said Mariposa Villaluna, who helped organize a grass-roots campaign to remove the statue. ‘It celebrates human subjugation.’

The statue has been the focus of heated debate in the past. In the early 1990s, when the city announced a plan to move the Pioneer Monument to its current location, Native American activists urged the city to leave ‘Early Days’ behind.

After years of debate, the city kept the statue but installed a plaque meant to add historical context…But the decades-long effort to move “Early Days” to storage was reinvigorated in August, after a deadly white nationalist rally in Charlottesville over the potential removal of a statue of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee…The city is planning to remove the statue sometime this year, according to Kate Patterson, a spokeswoman for the arts commission. It will be moved to storage and replaced with a plaque that details the reasoning behind the decision.”

Category: Social